Mass Schedule of Rev. Fr. David Hewko

November 2021

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
  • Holy Mass 8:00pm in MA
  • Holy Mass in the UK
2
  • 3 Consecutive Masses 5:00pm in MA
3
  • Holy Mass 7:30am in MA
4
  • Holy Mass 7:30am in MA
5
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA
6
  • Holy Mass 8:30am in MA
7
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in NY
  • Livestreaming Holy Mass 9:30am in MA
8
9
10
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA
11
  • Holy Mass 7:30am in MA
12
  • Holy Mass 7:30am in MA
13
  • Nuptial Mass 11:00am in AZ
14
  • Holy Mass 4:00pm in CA
  • Holy Mass 9:30am in CA
15
16
  • Family Day Retreat in CA
17
18
19
20
  • Holy Mass 9:00am in WA
21
  • Holy Mass 10:00am in ID
  • Holy Mass 6:00pm in MT
22
  • Holy Mass 6:00pm in ID
23
  • Holy Mass 6:30pm in MA
24
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA
25
  • Holy Mass 8:00am in MA
26
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA
27
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in DE
  • Holy Mass 7:30am in MA
28
  • (Cancelled ) Holy Mass 5:30pm in PA
  • (Cancelled) Holy Mass 9:30am in PA
  • Holy Mass 10:00am in PA
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in PA
29
  • Holy Mass 8:00am in PA
30
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA

 
   Our Lady of Fátima Chapel
     Massachusetts Mission of the SSPX-MC

 


              

Names of the Deceased
 

 

November, the Month of the Holy Souls, is right around the corner. Beginning today, and during the entire month of November, Our Lady of Fatima Chapel is accepting names of the deceased to be placed upon the altar for remembrance during every Holy Sacrifice of the Mass offered throughout November. 

The names of the deceased placed upon our altar will also be remembered during each Holy Mass offered at all of the SSPX-MC missions; wherever the Holy Sacrifice is scheduled to be offered by the Apostolate during the month of November.

Please send the names of the deceased you wish to be prayed for to:
 

By Email:
ourladyofatimachapel@gmail.com

By Postal Address:
OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHAPEL
16 DOGWOOD ROAD SOUTH
HUBBARDSTON, MA 01452

 
 

The Western tradition identifies the general custom of praying for the dead dating as far back as the Second Book of Maccabees 12:42-46. The custom of setting apart a special day for intercession for the faithful departed on November 2nd was first established by Saint Odilo of Cluny (d. 1048) at his abbey of Cluny in 998. From Cluny the custom spread to the other houses of the Cluniac order, which became the largest and most extensive network of monasteries in Europe. The custom was soon adopted in several dioceses in France, then spread throughout the Western Church. It was accepted in Rome only in the fourteenth century. While November 2nd remained the liturgical observance, in time the entire month of November became associated in the Western Catholic tradition with prayers for the departed; and the lists of names of those to be remembered being placed in the proximity of the altar on which the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is offered.

The legend connected with its foundation is given by Peter Damiani in his Life of Saint Odilo: A pilgrim returning from the Holy Land was cast by a storm on a desolate island. A hermit living there told him that amid the rocks was a chasm communicating with purgatory, from which perpetually rose the groans of tortured souls. The hermit also claimed he had heard the demons complaining of the efficacy of the prayers of the faithful, and especially prayers from the monks of Cluny, in rescuing their victims. Upon returning home, the pilgrim hastened to inform the abbot of Cluny, who then set November 2nd as a day of intercession on the part of his community for all the Holy Souls in Purgatory.

+   +   +
Requiem aeternam dona eis Domine: et lux perpetua luceat eis quorum animas omnium fidelium defunctorum per misericordiam Dei requiescant in pace. Amen

Act of Spiritual Communion

As I cannot this day enjoy the happiness of assisting at the holy Mysteries, O my God! I transport myself in spirit at the foot of Thine altar; I unite with the Church, which by the hands of the priest, offers Thee Thine adorable Son in the Holy Sacrifice; I offer myself with Him, by Him, and in His Name. I adore, I praise, and thank Thee, imploring Thy mercy, invoking Thine assistance, and presenting Thee the homage I owe Thee as my Creator, the love due to Thee as my Savior.

Apply to my soul, I beseech Thee, O merciful Jesus, Thine infinite merits; apply them also to those for whom I particularly wish to pray. I desire to communicate spiritually, that Thy Blood may purify, Thy Flesh strengthen, and Thy Spirit sanctify me. May I never forget that Thou, my divine Redeemer, hast died for me; may I die to all that is not Thee, that hereafter I may live eternally with Thee. Amen.

+ SANCTUARY LAMP +

Announcing the availability of reserving the Sanctuary Lamp in Our Lady of Fatima Chapel (this is Fr Hewko’s personal chapel in Massachusetts). The red sanctuary lamp burns continually in honor of the Real & Divine Presence of Christ the King in our Chapel’s Tabernacle (or, as the little seer, Francisco Marto, so affectionately called it: the “Hidden Jesus”). Now, the faithful may reserve each new candle – burning in this honor – especially for their intentions. The votive lamp usually burns for 7 to 8 days… If you’d like to have the lamp burn for your intentions, simply send a note with your request, along with your name and the desired date if you have one. The suggested donation for each lamp lighting is $20.00

Send your request & offering, or any other donation to: paypal.me/ourladyofatimachapel
 

Our Lady of Fatima Chapel Sanctuary Lamp Honoring Our Lord’s Real Presence

Contact:

ourladyofatimachapel@gmail.com

(Taken from Our Lady of Fatima Chapel’s August 2019 email)

 

SCROLL DOWN TO VIEW THE MOST RECENT “OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHAPEL NEWSLETTER”. A SINCERE THANK YOU TO THE CHAPEL’S COORDINATOR FOR THESE COMPILATIONS.

 
 
   Our Lady of Fátima Chapel
     Massachusetts Mission of the SSPX-MC


              


Advent Begins 

From the stem of Jesse, according to the prophecy of Isaias, there came forth a most fair flower, and that flower was Christ. It is therefore only natural that there should be a continuity between the liturgy of the synagogue and that of the Christian faith. The authority of Imperial Rome even confused the Christians with the Jews; during the transitional period the Christian family, presenting the outward and legal appearance of a Jewish community, borrowed there from likewise various liturgical usages which still form part of her Sacred patrimony, and, like her faith, are, so to speak, of the seed of Abraham and of Israel by origin and descent.

The Roman Advent bore a joyful character; now we regard this season as a penitential time, or at least, a time in which the absence of Christ is stressed in the Liturgy. It is a season of preparation, because during all the years before the birth of Our Savior, the events of human history led up to this central fact.

The chants of the Mass, the responsories, the antiphons of the divine Office, all contain Alleluias. The Gloria in excelsis is omitted from the ferial Masses until Christmas. It would seem that the whole of nature, looking forward, as the Apostle describes it, to the last judgment, awaiting the revelation of the Son of God, feels herself uplifted by the Incarnation of the Word of God, Who after so many ages of waiting, comes at length into this world to bring His greatest handiwork to its final perfection.

The Sacred Liturgy, during this time, gathers from the Scriptures all those passages which are most forcible and best adapted to express the intense and joyful longing with which the holy patriarchs, the prophets and the just men of the Old Testament hastened by their prayers the coming of the Son of God. We cannot do better than associate ourselves with their pious feelings, and pray the Word made Flesh that He will deign to be born in the hearts of all men and spread His kingdom likewise throughout those many lands where His holy Name has not hitherto been made known, and whose inhabitants still sleep in darkness and the shadow of death.

The Roman Missal today begins the liturgical cycle. The Incarnation is the true central point which divides the course of the ages. By this period of preparation called Advent, the ages before Christ and leading us to His birth are recalled; following the feast of Christmas the great events in the life of Christ and the ages that lead toward the final judgment are kept in mind. The Missal, therefore, is logical and corresponds closely to this lofty concept of history, by which the Incarnation is made the true central event in the world’s drama.

The spirit of the sacred Liturgy during Advent, full of the joyful announcement of approaching freedom, is one of holy enthusiasm, tender gratitude, and an intense longing for the coming of the Word of God in the hearts of all the children of Adam. Man is made up of spirit and flesh, and whilst the former desirous of being drawn towards truth and love, the latter understands only such good or evil as can be perceived by the senses, and must therefore be held in check by penance and by a salutary fear of the judgments of almighty God. – The Roman Missal

Continue Reading About: 

MEDITATION FOR ADVENT (by Archbishop Viganò)
___________________________________________ 
 

This Week’s Holy Mass Schedule

Today – Sunday, November 28th
First Sunday of Advent

Holy Mass LiveStream from Philadelphia, PA – 10:00 AM EST
Find Link Here

Tuesday, November 30th – 5:30 PM
Saint Andrew, Apostle

Wednesday, December 1st – 7:30 AM
Ferial Day

Thursday, December 2nd – 7:30 AM
Saint Bibiana, Virgin & Martyr

First Friday, December 3rd – 5:30 PM
Saint Francis Xavier, Confessor

First Saturday, December 4th – 7:30 AM
Saint Barbara, Virgin & Martyr
Making the Five First Saturdays

First Friday & First Saturday Holy Mass LiveStreams
Find Links Here

Confessions / Rosary – 30 Minutes Before Mass

__________________________________________


Sorrowful Heart of Mary Oratory Fund-Raiser
Invest in the Future of the Traditional Catholic Priesthood

“Operation Survival” 
See Details Here

__________________________________________


First Sunday of Advent 

The night is passed, and the day is at hand: Let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and put on the armor of light. – Rom. xiii. 12  

This Sunday, the first of the ecclesiastical year, is called, in the chronicles and charts of the middle ages, Ad te levavi Sunday, from the first words of the Introit; or, Aspiciens a longe, from the first words of one of the responsories of Matins.

The Station is at St. Mary Major’s. It is under the auspices of Mary – in the splendid basilica which possesses the crib of Bethlehem, and is therefore called, in ancient documents, St. Mary’s ad Praesepe – that the Roman Church recommences, each year, the sacred cycle. It would have been impossible to select a place more suitable than this for saluting the approach of the divine birth, which is to gladden heaven and earth, and manifest the sublime portent of a Virgin Mother. Let us go in spirit to this august temple, and unite in the prayers which are there being offered up: they are the very ones we also use, and which we will now explain.

[The Stations marked in the Roman missal for certain days in the year, were formerly processions, in which the whole clergy and people went to some given church, and there celebrated the Office and Mass. This usage, which dates from the earliest period of the Roman Church, and of which St. Gregory the Great was but the restorer, still exists, at least in a measure; for the Stations are still observed, though with less solemnity and concourse of people, on all the days specified in the missal.]

In the night Office, the Church commences the reading of the Book of Isaias, who, of all the Prophets, has the most distinctly and explicitly foretold the Messias; and she continues this same Book until Christmas day inclusively. Let us strive to enter into the teaching of the holy prophet, and let the eye of our faith affectionately recognize the promised Saviour in the descriptions, sometimes consoling and sometimes terrifying, under which Isaias depicts Him.

The first words of the Church, in the still midnight, are these:

Regem venturum Dominum, venite adoremus.

Come, let us adore the King our Lord, who is to come.

This first duty of adoration complied with, let us listen to the oracle of the Prophet Isaias, delivered to us by the holy Church.

Lectio liber Isaiæ Prophetæ. Beginning of the Book of the Prophet Isaias.
Cap. iii et iv. Ch. iii and iv.

Visio Isaiæ, filii Amos, quam vidit super Judam et Jerusalem, in diebus Oziae, Joathan, Achaz, et Ezechiæ, regum Juda. Audite, cæli, et auribus percipe, terra, quoniam Dominus locutus est. Filios enutrivi, et exaltavi; ipsi autem spreverunt me. Cognovit bos possessorem suum, et asinus præsepe domini sui; Israel autem me non cognovit, et populus meus non intellexit. Vae genti peccatrici, populo gravi iniquitate, semini nequam, filiis sceleratis! dereliquerunt Dominum; blasphemaverunt Sanctum Israel; abalienati sunt retrorsum. Super quo percutiam vos ultra, addentes prævaricationem? omne caput languidum, et omne cor mœrens. A planta pedis usque ad verticem, non est in eo sanitas; vulnus, et livor, et plaga tumens, non est circumligata, nec curata medicamine, neque fota oleo.

The vision of Isaias the son of Amos I which he saw concerning Juda and Jerusalem in the days of Ozias, Joathan, Achaz, and Ezechias, kings of Juda. Hear, O ye heavens, and give ear, O earth, for the Lord hath spoken. I have brought up children, and exalted them: but they have despised me. The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master’ s crib: but Israel hath not known me, and my people hath not understood. Woe to the sinful nation, a people laden with iniquity, a wicked seed, ungracious children: they have forsaken the Lord, they have blasphemed the Holy One of Israel, they are gone away backwards. For what shall I strike you any more, you that increase transgression? the whole head is sick, and the whole heart is sad. From the sole of the foot unto the top of the head, there is no soundness therein: wounds and bruises and swelling sores: they are not bound up, nor dressed, nor fomented with oil

These words of the holy prophet, or rather of God who speaks to us by the prophet, should make a deep impression on the children of the Church, at this opening of the holy period of Advent. Who could hear without trembling this voice of our Lord, who is despised and unknown even at the very time when He is coming to visit His people? Lest men should be terrified at the splendor of His majesty, He divested Himself of it; and far from acknowledging the divine power of Him who thus humbled Himself out of love to them, these men have refused even to know Him; and the crib where He lay after His birth, had, at first, but two dumb animals to honor or notice it. Do you feel, Christians, how just are the complaints which your God here makes? And how your indifference for all His love is an insult? He calls heaven and earth to witness; He utters anathema against the sinful nation, His ungrateful children. Let us honestly confess that we, too, have not known the value of our Jesus’ visit to us, and that we have but too faithfully imitated the obduracy of the Jews, who heeded not the bright light when it burst upon their darkness. In vain did the angels sing on that December night; in vain did shepherds receive and welcome the invitation to adore the Babe and know Him; in vain did the Magi come from the east, asking where they were to find the crib of the King that was born. At this last example, the city of Jerusalem was somewhat moved; but the astonishment was only for a moment, and the old indifference soon stifled the good tidings.

Thus it is, O Jesus, that Thou comest unto darkness, and darkness does not comprehend Thee. We beseech Thee, let our darkness comprehend the light, and desire it. The day will come when Thou wilt disperse the spiritual and voluntary darkness of men by the awful light of Thy justice. Thy glory, O sovereign Judge, will be magnificent on that day, and we love to think upon Thy having it: but during these days of our life on earth, deliver us from Thy wrath. We are one great wound from the sole of the foot unto the top of the head; Thou knowest not where to strike: be, then, a Saviour, O Jesus, in this coming, for which we are now preparing. The whole head is sick, and the whole heart is sad: come, and raise up this head which shame and vile passions bow down to the earth. Come, and comfort this heart oppressed with sin and fear. We confess it, our wounds are deep and sore; come, thou good Samaritan, pour in Thy soothing oil and heal them.

The whole world is in expectation of its Redeemer; come, dear Jesus, show Thyself to it by granting it salvation. The Church, Thy bride, is now commencing another year, and her first word is to Thee, a word which she speaks in the anxious solicitude of a mother for the safety of her children; she cries out to Thee, saying: ‘Come!’ No, we will go no farther in our journey through the desert of this life without Thee, O Jesus! Time is passing quickly away from us; our day is perhaps far spent, and the shades of our life’s night are fast coming on; arise, O divine Sun of justice. Come! guide our steps and save us from eternal death. 


MASS

While the priest is approaching the altar, there to offer up the holy sacrifice, the Church opens her chants by this beautiful one, which so well expresses her confidence as the beloved bride of Jesus. Let us repeat it together with her, and let the heart be in harmony with our voice, for the Saviour comes to each of us in proportion to the earnestness of our longing for Him.

Introit

Ad te levavi animam meam: Deus meus, in te confido, non erubiscam; neque irrideant me inimici mei, etenim universi qui te exspectant non confudentur.

To thee have I lifted up my soul: in thee, O my God, I put my trust, let me not be ashamed: neither let my enemies laugh at me: for none of them that wait on thee shall be confounded.

Ps. Vias tuas, Domine, demonstra mihi: et semitas tuas edoce me.

Ps. Show, O Lord, thy ways to me, and teach me thy paths.

℣. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in sæcula sæculorum.
Amen.

℣. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Repeat: Ad te levavi.

Repeat: To thee.

After the Kyrie eleison, the Priest embodies in the following prayers, called on that account the Collects, all the desires and petitions of the Church for this first Sunday: 

Collect

Excita quæsumus, Domine, potentiam tuam et veni: ut ab imminentibus peccatorum nostrorum periculis, te mereamur protegente eripi, te liberante salvari. Qui vivis et regnas cum Deo Patre in unitate Spiritus Sancti, Deus, per omnia sæcula sæculorum.

Exert, we beseech thee, O Lord, thy power, and come: that by thy protection we may be freed from the imminent dangers of our sins, and be saved by thy mercy. Who liveth and reigneth with God the Father, in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, world without end.

℟. Amen.

℟. Amen.

It is right that we should also beg, during this holy season, the all-powerful mediation of Her who, at first, was the sole depository of the great secret which was to give life to the world. Let us then say with the Priest:

In Honor of the Blessed Virgin

Deus, qui de beatæ Mariæ Virginis utero Verbum tuum Angelo nuntiante, carnem suscipere voluisti: præsta supplicibus tuis; ut, qui vere eam Genitricem Dei credimus, ejus apud te intercessionibus adjuvemur.

O God, who wast pleased that thy Word, when the Angel delivered his message, should take flesh in the womb of the Blessed Virgin Mary, give ear to our humble petitions, and grant that we who believe her to be truly the Mother of God, may be helped by her prayers.

To this is immediately added one of the following Prayers:

Against the Persecutors of the Church

Ecclesiæ tuæ, quæsumus, Domine, preces placatus admitte: ut, destructis adveritatibus et erroribus universis, secura tibi serviat libertate. Per Dominum.

Mercifully hear, we beseech thee, O Lord, the prayers of thy Church: that, all oppositions and errors being removed, she may serve thee with a secure liberty. Through, &c.

For the Pope

Deus, omnium fidelium Pastor et Rector, famulum tuum N. Quem Pastorem Ecclesiæ tuæ præsse voluisti, propitius respice: da ei, quæsumus, verbo et exemplo, quibus præest, proficere; ut ad vitam, una cum grege sibi credito, perveniat sempiternam. Per Dominum.

O God, the Pastor and Ruler of all the faithful, look down, in thy mercy, on thy servant N., whom thou hast appointed Pastor over thy Church; and grant, we beseech thee, that both by word and example, he may edify all those that are under his charge; and with the flock entrusted to him, arrive at length at eternal happiness. Through, &c.

Epistle
Lectio Epistolæ beati Pauli Apostoli ad Romanos. Lesson of the Epistle of St. Paul the Apostle, to the Romans.
Cap. xiii. Ch. xiii.

Fratres, scientes quia hora est jam nos de somno surgere. Nunc enim propior est nostra salus, quam cum credidimus. Nox præcessit, dies autem appropinquavit. Abjiciamus ergo opera tenebrarum, et induamur arma lucis. Sicut in die honeste ambulemus: non in comessationibus, et ebrietatibus, non in cubilibus, et impudicitiis, non in contentione, et æmulatione: sed induamini Dominum Jesum Christum.

Brethren, know that it is now the hour for us to rise from sleep. For now our salvation is nearer than when we believed. The night is passed, and the day is at hand. Let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and put on the armour of light. Let us walk honestly, as in the day: not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and impurities, not in contention and envy: but put ye on the Lord Jesus Christ.

The Savior, then, who is coming to us is the clothing which we are to put on over our spiritual nakedness. Here let us admire the goodness of our God, who, remembering that man hid himself after his sin, because he was naked, vouchsafes himself to become man’s clothing, and cover with the robe of his Divinity the misery of human nature. Let us, therefore, be on the watch for the day and the hour when he will come to us, and take precautions against the drowsiness which comes of custom and self-indulgence. The light will soon appear; may its first rays be witness of our innocence, or at least of our repentance. If our Savior is coming to put over our sins a covering which is to hide them forever, the least that we, on our part, can do is to retain no further affection for those sins, else it will be said of us that we refused our salvation. The last words of this Epistle were those which caught the eye of St. Augustine, when, after a long resistance to the grace which pressed him to give himself to God, he resolved to obey the voice which said to him: Tolle lege; take and read. They decided his conversion; he immediately resolved to abandon the worldly life he had hitherto led, and put on Christ Jesus. Let us begin this very day, and imitate this Saint. Let us long for that dear and glorious Clothing, with which the mercy of our heavenly Father is so soon to cover us, and say with the Church these touching words, which we cannot repeat too often during this time of the year: 

Gradual

Universi qui te exspectant, non confundentur, Domine.

None of them that wait on thee shall be confounded, O Lord.

℣. Vias tuas, Domine, notas fac mihi: et semitas tuas edoce me. Alleluia, alleluia.

℣. Show, O Lord, thy ways to me: and teach me thy paths. Alleluia, alleluia.

℣. Ostende nobis, Domine, misericordiam tuam: et salutari tuum da nobis. Alleluia.

℣. Show us, O Lord, thy mercy: and grant us thy salvation. Alleluia.

Gospel

Sequentia sancti Evangelii secundum Lucam.

Sequel of the holy Gospel according to St. Luke.

Cap. xxi. Ch. xxi.

In illo tempore: Dixit Jesus discipulis suis: Erunt signa in sole, et luna, et stellis, et in terris pressura gentium prae confusione sonitus maris, et fluctuum: arescentibus hominibus prae timore, et exspectatione, quæ supervenient universo orbi: nam virtutes cælorum movebuntur: et tunc videbunt Filium hominis venientem in nube cum potestate magna et majestate. His autem fieri incipientibus, respicite, et levate capita vestra: quoniam appropinquat redemptio vestra. Et dixit illis similitudinem: Videte ficulneam, et omnes arbores: cum producunt jam ex se fructum, scitis quoniam prope est æstas. Ita et vos cum videritis haec fieri, scitote quoniam prope est regnum Dei. Amen dico vobis, quia non præteribit generatio haec, donec omnia fiant. Cælum et terra transibunt: verba autem mea non transibunt.

At that time: Jesus said to his disciples: There shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, by reason of the confusion of the roaring of the sea and of the waves; Men withering away for fear, and expectation of what shall come upon the whole world. For the powers of heaven shall be moved; And then they shall see the Son of man coming in a cloud, with great power and majesty. But when these things begin to come to pass, look up, and lift up your heads, because your redemption is at hand. And he spoke to them in a similitude. See the fig tree, and all the trees: When they now shoot forth their fruit, you know that summer is nigh; So you also, when you shall see these things come to pass, know that the kingdom of God is at hand. Amen, I say to you, this generation shall not pass away, till all things be fulfilled. Heaven and earth shall pass away, but my words shall not pass away.

Thou art to come, then, O Jesus, in all the terror of the Last Judgment, and when men least expect thee. In a few days, thou art coming to us to clothe our misery with the garment of thy mercy; a garment of glory and immortality to us; but thou art to come again on a future day, an din such dread majesty that men will wither away with fear. O my Savior! condemn me not on that day of the world’s destruction. Visit me now in thy love and mercy; I am resolved to prepare my soul. I desire that thou shouldst come and be born within me, so that when the convulsions of nature warn me of thy coming to judge me, I may lift up my head, as thou biddest thy faithful disciples do, who, when the rest of men shall tremble at the thunder of thy Judgment, will have confidence in thee, because they have thee in their hearts.

During the offering of the Bread and Wine, the Church, with her look steadfastly fixed on Him who is to come, keeps to her sweet canticle:

Offertory

Ad te levavi animam meam: Deus meus, in te confido, non erubescam; neque irrideant me inimici mei: etenim universi, qui te exspectant, non confundentur.

To thee, O Lord, have I lifted up my soul: in thee, O my God, I put my trust, let me not be ashamed; neither let my enemies laugh at me: for none of them that wait on thee shall be confounded.

After the oblation, she silently presents to God the petitions of all her children by the following Prayers:

Secrets

Hæc sacra nos, Domine, potenti virtute mundatos, ad suum faciant puriores venire principium. Per Dominum.

Grant, O Lord, that these sacred mysteries may cleanse us by their powerful virtue, and bring us with greater purity to him, who was the author and institutor of them. Through, &c.

Of the Blessed Virgin

In mentibus nostris, quæsumus, Domine, veræ fidei sacramenta confirma; ut qui conceptum de Virgine Deum verum et hominem confitemur, per ejus salutiferæ Resurrectionis potentiam, ad æternam mereamur pervenire lætitiam.

Strengthen, we beseech thee, O Lord, in our souls the mysteries of the true faith: that we who confess him that was conceived of a Virgin, to be true God and true man, may, by the power of his saving Resurrection, deserve to come to eternal joys.

Against the Persecutors of the Church

Protege nos, Domine, tuis mysteriis servientes: ut divinis rebus inhærentes, et coropore tibi famulemur et mente. Per Dominum.

Protect us, O Lord, while we assist at thy sacred mysteries: that being employed in acts of religion, we may serve thee both in body and mind. Through, &c.

For the Pope

Oblatis, quæsumus, Domine, placare muneribus: et famulum tum N. quem Pastorem Ecclesiæ tuæ præsse voluisti, assidua protectione guberna. Per Dominum.

Be appeased, O Lord, with the offering we have made: and cease not to protect thy servant N., whom thou hast been pleased to appoint Pastor over thy Church. Through, &c.

After the Communion of the Priest and people, the Choir sings these beautiful words of David in praise of the sweetness of the divine Fruit, whom our Earth is going to bring forth, and who has just given himself, by anticipation, to his faithful servants. This Earth, which is ours, and which, as the prophet Isaias says, opens and buds forth the Savior, is the Blessed Virgin Mary made fruitful by the dew of heaven.

Then follow the concluding prayers of thanksgiving.

Communion

Dominus dabit benignitatem: et terra nostra dabit fructum suum.

The Lord will give his goodness: and our earth shall yield her fruit.

Postcommunion

Suscipiamus, Domine, misericordiam tuam in medio templi tui: ut reparationis nostræ ventura solemnia congruis honoribus præcedamus. Per Dominum.

May we receive, O Lord, thy mercy in the midst of thy temple: that with due honor we may prepare for the approaching solemnity of our reparation. Through, &c.

Of the Blessed Virgin

Gratiam tuam, quæsumus, Domine, mentibus nostris infunde: ut qui, Angelo nuntiante, Christi Filii tui Incarnationem cognovimus, per Passionem ejus, et Crucem, ad Resurrectionis gloriam perducamur.

Pour forth, we beseech thee, O Lord, thy grace into our hearts, that we to whom the Incarnation of Christ thy Son was made known by the message of an Angel, may, by his Passion and Cross, be brought to the glory of his Resurrection.

Against the Persecutors of the Church

Quæsumus, Domine Deus noster: ut quos divina tribuis participatione gaudere, humanis non sinas subjacere periculis.

We beseech thee, O Lord our God, not to leave exposed to the dangers of human life, those whom thou hast permitted to partake of these divine mysteries.

For the Pope

Hæc nos, quæsumus Domine, divini Sacramenti perceptio protegat: et famulum tuum N. quem Pastorem Ecclesiæ tuæ præsse voluisti, una cum commisso sibi grege salvet semper et muniat. Per Dominum.

May the participation of this divine Sacrament protect us, we beseech thee, O Lord; and always procure safety and defense to thy servant N., whom thou hast appointed Pastor over thy Church, together with the flock committed to his charge. Through, &c.

 
 
 
SSPX-MC
SSPX-MC
Sermons
Sermons
Catacombs
Catacombs
Contact
Contact
Fr. Hewko
Fr. Hewko

Sanctuary Lamp Sponsorship  
Please send your name & date request HERE
Or, mail to the Chapel Postal Address below
(Suggested Offering: $20.00) 

Chapel Email List Subscription
Please send your email address to:
ourladyofatimachapel@gmail.com

OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHAPEL
16 DOGWOOD ROAD SOUTH
HUBBARDSTON, MA 01452

 
 
 
 
   Our Lady of Fátima Chapel
     Massachusetts Mission of the SSPX-MC


              

Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal
Today’s Feast Day – November 27th

Holy Mass – 7:30 AM
Confessions / Rosary – 7:00 AM

 

O Mary Conceived Without Sin, Pray For Us Who Have Recourse To Thee
 

Not long after France’s horrific Reign of Terror, in January of 1830, a young, twenty-three year old Catherine Labouré entered the hospice of the Daughters of Charity at Chatillon-sur-Seine. It was during these days that the Masonic government encouraged the travesty of daily sacrilege, all the while blasphemously committed in the name of liberté, egalité and fraternité – freedom, equality and brotherhood!

Even the body of Saint Genevieve, the Patroness of France, was desecrated. Saint Vincent de Paul’s body had been hidden, but four days after Sister Catherine’s entry into the Mother House at Rue de Bac in Paris, Saint Vincent’s remains were transferred back to his own church with a defiant and joyous procession.

 
The First Apparition 

Later that same year, Sister Catherine was blessed with the apparitions of Mary Immaculate to which we owe the Miraculous Medal. The first apparition came on the eve of the feast of Saint Vincent, July 19th. The mother superior had given each of the novices a piece of cloth from the holy founder’s surplice, in which Sister Catherine earnestly prayed to Saint Vincent that she might, with her own eyes, see the Mother of God.

That night, a beautiful child awoke her from her sleep, saying: “Sister Labouré, come to the chapel; the Blessed Virgin is waiting for you!” When Sister Catherine went to the chapel, she found it ablaze with lights as if prepared for Midnight Mass. Quietly, she knelt at the Communion rail, and suddenly heard the rustle of a silk dress. The Blessed Virgin, in a vision of glory, sat in a chair like that of Saint Anne’s.

Sister Catherine arose, then went over and knelt, resting her hands in the Virgin’s lap, and felt the Virgin’s arms around her, as she said: “God wishes to charge you with a mission. You will be contradicted, but do not fear; you will have the grace. Tell your spiritual director all that passes within you. Times are evil in France and in the world.” Then, a pained expression crossed the Blessed Virgin’s face:

“Come to the foot of the altar. Graces will be shed on all, great and little, especially upon those who seek them. Another community of sisters will join the Rue du Bac community. The community will become large; you will have the protection of God and Saint Vincent; I will always have my eyes upon you.” Then, like a fading shadow, Our Lady was gone!

 
 
The Second Apparition 

Four months passed until our Blessed Lady returned to Rue du Bac. Here are Sister Catherine’s own words describing the apparition:

On the 27th of November, 1830 …while making my meditation in profound silence …I seemed to hear on the right hand side of the sanctuary something like the rustling of a silk dress. Glancing in that direction, I perceived the Blessed Virgin standing near Saint Joseph’s picture. Her height was medium and her countenance, indescribably beautiful. She was dressed in a robe the color of the dawn, high-necked, with plain sleeves. Her head was covered with a white veil, which floated over her shoulders down to her feet. Her feet rested upon a globe, or rather one half of a globe, for that was all that could be seen. Her hands which were on a level with her waist, held in an easy manner another globe, a figure of the world. Her eyes were raised to Heaven, and her countenance beamed with light as she offered the globe to Our Lord. On her fingers were many rings, filled with jewels and precious stones, from which shining rays of light descended. As I was busy contemplating her, the Blessed Virgin fixed her eyes upon me, and a voice said in the depths of my heart:
https://gallery.mailchimp.com/357fd2f68d70dee08663782ab/images/4137104b-dbb3-4c90-a7ac-a406dc15ba03.jpg
‘ This orb which you see is the world, France in particular, and each person individually. I am praying for it and for everyone in the world. The rays which fall on this orb are the graces which I give to those who ask for them. But there are no rays from some of the stones. For many people fail to receive graces because they neglect to ask for them.

There now formed around the Blessed Virgin a frame rather oval in shape on which were written in letters of gold these words: ‘O Mary conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee.’ Then a voice said to me:

‘Have a medal struck upon this model. All those who wear it, when it is blessed, will receive great graces especially if they wear it round the neck. Those who repeat this prayer with devotion will be in a special manner under the protection of the Mother of God. Graces will be abundantly bestowed upon those who have confidence.’

At the same instant, the oval frame seemed to turn around. Then I saw on the back of it the letter ‘M’, surmounted by a cross, with a crossbar beneath it, and under the monogram of the name of Mary, the Holy Hearts of Jesus and of His Mother; the first surrounded by a crown of thorns and the second trans-pierced by a sword. I was anxious to know what words must be placed on the reverse side of the medal; and after many prayers, one day in meditation, I seemed to hear a voice which said to me: ‘The ‘M’ with the Cross and the two Hearts tell enough.’” 

Encircling the sphere were twelve stars bordering the golden elliptical frame. Originally, it was named The Medal of the Immaculate Conception. The medal streamed from the presses by the millions, quickly overflowing France, and well into the world beyond. Not long after, there was an epidemic in France. The death rate soared and medical science was unable to cope with the crisis. People turned to the Sisters of Charity who gave them the Medal with the assurance that great graces would be showered upon all who would wear it with confidence.

After the first cures, people demanded it excitedly. So many favors, cures, and conversions were effected through its instrumentality that its name and doctrinal significance were lost in the clamor; it became known simply as The Miraculous Medal. 

This apparition was the Immaculata’s first official herald; and this Heaven-sent insignia ushered in what became known as the modern Age of Mary. It would prepare the world for the great declaration a quarter of a century later – when Pope Blessed Pius IX would declare the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception as an article of Faith and an essential element of Catholic belief.


The Incorrupt Body of Saint Catherine Labouré

On the last day of 1876, Sister Catherine passed to her eternal reward. For the forty-six years from the year of the apparitions until her death, only she and her confessor knew who it was to whom the famous Miraculous Medal was revealed. As the years passed by, Sister Catherine performed daily her mundane and very ordinary tasks of sewing and door keeping, unknown to the world around her, which was buzzing with the miraculous effects of the Medal. 

When Sister Catherine’s body was exhumed for beatification 57 years after her death in 1933, it was found as fresh as the day it was buried – completely incorrupt! In 1947, she was canonized by Pope Pius XII. The feast day of Saint Catherine Labouré is tomorrow, November 28th. Her incorrupt body can still be seen today at the Mother House of the Daughters of Charity in The Chapel of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal, 140 Rue du Bac in Paris, France.

THIS DAY IN HISTORY

On the Anniversary of today’s feast day, at the dawn of the Twentieth Century, in 1902, Marie-Julie Jahenny, a French Stigmatist, received a Church approved message from Our Lord which warned of a “new liturgy” that would one day be instituted:

“I give you a warning. The disciples who are not of My Gospel are now working hard to remake according to their ideas, and under the influence of the enemy of souls, a Mass that contains words which are odious in My sight. When the fatal hour arrives where the faith of my priest is put to the test, it will be these texts that will be celebrated, in this second period. The first period is the one of My Priesthood, existing since Me. The second is the one of the persecution, when the enemies of the Faith and of Holy Religion will impose their formulas in the book of the second celebration. These infamous spirits are those who crucified Me and are awaiting the kingdom of the new messiah. Many of My holy priests will refuse this book, sealed with the words of the abyss. Unfortunately, amongst them are those who will accept it.” –  The Breton Stigmatist by the ‘Marquis’ de la Franquerie

 

OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHAPEL
16 DOGWOOD ROAD SOUTH
HUBBARDSTON, MA 01452

 

 
 

 
 
   Our Lady of Fátima Chapel
     Massachusetts Mission of the SSPX-MC


              

The Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Feast Day Today – November 21st

“The life of Mary was such as to serve as a model for all.” – Saint Ambrose

What is this festival?

This a feast set apart by the Church for the commemoration of the day on which the Blessed Virgin Mary, then in her most tender childhood, was offered by her pious parents, Joachim and Anne, to the Lord-God in the Temple, and on which Mary consecrated herself forever to God’s service.

How did this take place?

The parents of the Blessed Virgin had promised, as we learn by tradition, to offer the child which God would give them, to His service in the Temple. Mary, at the same time, child as she was, enlightened by divine inspiration had offered herself wholly to God, consecrating herself unreservedly to His love and service. She knew also, that her parents had made a vow to dedicate her to the service of God, for it was an old custom with the Jews to place their daughters in one of the rooms surrounding the Temple, there to be well educated by saintly women, as now did Joachim and Anne with their holy child. As Mary, though only three years of age, knew of her parents’ vow, she intended (as Saints Germanus and Epiphanius testify) to solemnly dedicate herself to God in the Temple; she therefore entreated her parents to take her to the Temple and fulfill their promise to God, after which, as Saint Gregory of Nyssa tells us, Saint Anne no longer delayed accompanying her to the Temple and offering her to God. Mary, like a graceful dove, hastened on the wings of desire in advance; simple and without external show was her entrance into the Temple, but innumerable heavenly spirits celebrated this festival, and the Most High looked down with pleasure upon this purest and holiest sacrifice ever offered in His Temple. The three holy persons fell on their faces and adored the living God; the parents in deepest humility, adoration, and reverence offered Him their daughter; and Mary gave thanks to the God of Israel, that He had given her the grace to serve Him, and to give herself to Him to be His handmaid forever. Then Joachim and Anne gave their beloved child to the priest Zacharias who presided over the holy service, and who, having offered prayers and sacrifices for her, led her to that part of the Temple where the maidens dedicated to God’s service were educated. Here, Mary shone as a model for all the maidens who were with her in the Temple, and she shines still for all who, like her, consecrate their virginity to God, and devote themselves wholly and entirely to His service.

INSTRUCTION I 

How wonderfully noble were the minds of Mary’s parents, which enabled them to deprive themselves of their beloved child for the love of God, offering her to Him, the Most High, willingly leaving her in the Temple for His holy service! True love of God is ready for any sacrifices, prepared to do whatever He requires.

Parents! God does not require from all of you, that you, like Joachim and Anne, should dedicate your children in a special manner to Him, but He does require of you all, that you see in your children the temple of the Holy Ghost, and that you should guard them from every stain of sin. From their earliest youth you should, if you wish for joy in your children, train them for God’ service, changing your dwelling into God’s temple by a truly Catholic life.

 INSTRUCTION II

Mary, even in her tenderest childhood, offers up and consecrates herself; she gives herself unreservedly and irrevocably to God. When shall we give ourselves in earnest to God? We are offered to Him in baptism, it is true, and made His consecrated temple; we then renounced the world and the devil; we then bound ourselves to live for God only, and we have, since then, renewed our baptismal covenant with God. But have we kept to it? Have we not with one hand stolen that, which with the other we offered to God? Have we not profaned with shameful desires the temple of our heart? Have we not lived more for ourselves, for the world, for vanity than for God? When then will we truly give ourselves to God? In our old age perhaps? But will God, after we have spent our youth and strength in the service of the world, sin, and the devil, accept the offering of our weak, feeble body, of our sin-bound soul? Will He be satisfied to have us willing to serve Him, when we can no longer serve the world? if we commence to live for God, only when we commence to die? God is a jealous God, He is not satisfied with a heart divided between Him and creatures. He wishes to be loved with the whole heart, with the whole soul, and with all one’s strength. And thus He deserves to be loved; it is only such perfect love as this that He can reward, for He wishes to give Himself entirely to us, as we give ourselves entirely to Him, without reserve, for Christ says: If any one love Me, My Father will love him, and We will come to him, and will make Our abode with him. (John xiv:23)

Practical Considerations

The Presentation of Mary in the Temple

Let us adore the Holy Ghost inspiring Mary, whilst she was still a child, with the resolution to leave her family and all the pleasures of the domestic hearth, in order to shut herself up in the solitude of the Temple, and there lead a life of entire devotion to God and in God. Let us congratulate the Blessed Virgin on her perfect correspondence to grace, and let us rejoice at seeing her, whilst she was so young, already so great a saint.

Mary Teaches Us to Give Ourselves to God Without Delay

There were in the appurtenances of the Temple at Jerusalem two kinds of monasteries, where were received children of both genders who were dedicated to God by their parents, as is proved by the example of the youthful Samuel, and of Anne, the daughter of Phanuel. They were occupied there, according to their gender, either in the functions of the holy place or in its decoration, and in keeping in good condition the sacred vestments. Venerable priests were appointed for the education of the boys, and the girls were under the supervision of holy women filled with the spirit of wisdom – a true picture of our Religious Communities, shining with innocence and virtue. Mary was only at the entrance of life – she was hardly three years old – when she asked her parents to permit her to go and shut herself up in this holy asylum; they, knowing that children belong to God before belonging to their father and mother, consent to her wishes: and immediately the tender infant, docile to the voice of the heavenly Spouse who calls her (Ps. xliv. 11) betakes herself to Jerusalem. Her feet can hardly carry her before she ascends the steps of the Temple. Her tongue is scarcely loosed before she confidently pronounces the holy engagement of belonging to God alone. It is a beautiful lesson for parents, teaching them to form their children for piety from their very earliest years, and to give them to God when He asks them, whether it be that He calls them to the religious state, or that He withdraws them from this world to place them in His paradise. It is a beautiful lesson for childhood and youth, which teaches them to consecrate to God the first-fruits of their life. A beautiful lesson also Catholics, which tells them not to put to a later period their leading a better life. Let us begin this very day to lead the life in which we should like to die.

Now, let us transport ourselves in spirit to the Temple at Jerusalem, where Mary, after consecration, wished to dwell entirely cloistered, in order there to lead a wholly celestial life.

Let us consider firstly, what the life of Mary in the Temple was in regard to God. We commit two great offenses against God: they consist in forgetfulness and want of respect. We only think of God at rare intervals, and when we do think of Him we treat Him without reverence, at prayer, in church, everywhere, since He is everywhere. It was otherwise with Mary in the Temple. There, God occupied all her thoughts, filled all her affections, so that the whole world was as nothing to her, or rather served her only as steps by which to raise herself to God. She honored God in her superiors, she loved Him in her companions, she admired Him in the splendor of the skies, in the verdure of plants, in the beauty of flowers. If she spoke, it was of God and for God; if she worked or read, if she took a walk, if she granted her body food and repose, it was in order to please God, who willed that it should be thus. And who could give expression to the profound reverence with which this habitual remembrance of God was accompanied: What recollection in all her senses, what modesty in the whole of her deportment! When she prayed, with what humility did she not abase her nothingness in presence of the divine greatness, like a poor servant before the most august of masters (Luke i:38). With what confidence and abandonment she poured forth her soul into the heart of God! Let us encourage ourselves to imitate the life Mary led in the Temple.

Let us consider secondly, what the life of Mary was in regard to her neighbor. How beautiful was it to see Mary in the Temple in her relations with her superiors and her companions! With regard to the former, what respect, what docility, and what obedience did she not show, not only to their commands, but to their slightest wishes. With the latter, what charity, what gentleness, what forethought, and what delicate attention did she not manifest! Never did she show any rudeness of manner; never did she indulge in a sharp word or a critical remark; never did she allow herself to enter into any disputes or permit herself to contradict others, because she loved better to yield through condescension than to gain a victory at the expense of meekness; never was her behavior cold and careless; she always had an amiable welcome for everyone; she was gentle and gracious, always ready to render a service and to oblige others, not through natural kindness and sympathy or through human love, but from a sentiment of faith, from love of God, of Whom she loved and served in the person her neighbor. Such a beautiful example embellished and sanctified the community, leading all hearts to God, and the edification was universal. It is thus that Mary teaches us charity toward our neighbor. – From The Church’s Year by Rev. Fr. Leonard Goffine, 1871

More About the Blessed Virgin’s Presentation by Saint Alphonsus de’ Liguori – Read Here

____________________________________


This Week’s Holy Mass Schedule

Today – Sunday, November 21st
Twenty-sixth & Last Sunday After Pentecost
Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Holy Mass LiveStream from Idaho – 1:00 PM EST
Find Link Here

Tuesday, November 23rd – 6:30 PM
Saint Clement I, Pope & Martyr

Wednesday, November 24th – 5:30 PM
Saint John of the Cross, Confessor

Thursday, November 25th – 8:00 AM
Saint Catharine of Alexandria, Virgin & Martyr

Friday, November 26th – 5:30 PM
Saint Sylvester, Abbot

Saturday, November 27th – 7:30 AM
Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal

____________________________________

 

“We hold fast, with all our heart and with all our soul, to Catholic Rome, Guardian of the Catholic Faith and of the traditions necessary to preserve this faith, to Eternal Rome, Mistress of wisdom and truth . . .”

Today marks the 47th Anniversary of the “1974 Declaration” of Archbishop Marcel Lefebrve. This famous Declaration was an affirmation of the Catholic Faith in response to the Modernist crisis afflicting the post-conciliar Church.

On Thursday, November 21st, His Grace, scandalized by the opinions expressed by two recent Apostolic Visitors, drew up for his seminarians “in a spirit of doubtlessly excessive indignation ” this famous declaration as his stand against Modernism.

Ten days before, two Apostolic Visitors from Rome arrived at the Saint Pius X Seminary in Econe, Switzerland. During their brief stay, they spoke to the seminarians and professors, maintaining their scandalous opinions such as: the ordination of married men will soon be a normal thing, truth changes with the times, and the traditional conception of the Resurrection of Our Lord is open to discussion.

Read the Archbishop’s Historic Declaration Here

____________________________________


Sorrowful Heart of Mary Oratory Fund-Raiser
Invest in the Future of the Traditional Catholic Priesthood

“Operation Survival” 
See Details Here

____________________________________

Last Sunday After Pentecost

And then shall appear the sign of the Son of man in heaven: and then shall all tribes of the earth mourn: and they shall see the Son of man coming in the clouds of heaven with much power and majesty. – Matthew xxiv:30

The number of the Sundays after Pentecost may exceed twenty-four, and go up as far as twenty-eight, according as Easter is each Year, more or less near to the vernal equinox. But the Mass here given is always reserved for the last; and the intervening ones, be their number what it may, are taken from the Sundays after the Epiphany, which in that case were not used at the beginning of the year. This, however, does not apply to the Introit, Gradual, Offertory, and Communion, which, as we have already said, are repeated from the twenty-third Sunday.

We have seen how that Mass of the twenty-third Sunday was regarded by our forefathers as really the last of the Cycle. Abbot Rupert has given us the profound meaning of its several parts. According to the teaching we have already pondered over, the reconciliation of Juda was shown us as being, in time, the term intended by God: the last notes of the sacred Liturgy blended with the last scene of the world’s history, as seen and known by God. The end proposed by eternal Wisdom, in the world’s creation, and mercifully continued after the Fall by the mystery of Redemption, has now (we speak of the Church’s Year and God’s workings) been fully carried out—this end was no other than that of divine Union with Human Nature, making it one in the unity of one only body. Now that the two antagonist-people, Gentile and Jew, are brought together in the one same New Man in Christ Jesus their Head, the Two Testaments, which so strongly marked the distinction between the ages of time, the one called the Old, the other the New—yes, these Two Testaments fade away and give place to the glory of the Eternal Alliance.

It was here, therefore, that Mother Church formerly finished her Liturgical Year. She was delighted at what she had done during all the past months; that is, at having led her children not only to have a thorough appreciation of the divine plan, which she had developed before then in her celebrations, but moreover, and more especially, to unite them themselves by a veritable Union to their Jesus, by a real communion of views and interests and loves. On this account, she used not to revert again to the second Coming of the God-Man and the Last Judgment, two great subjects which she had proposed for her children’s reflections, at the commencement of the Purgative Life, that is, her season of Advent. It is only since a few centuries that, with a view of giving to her Year a conclusion more defined and intelligible to the Faithful of these comparatively recent times, she closes the Cycle with the prophetic description of the dread Coming of her Lord, which is to put an end to Time and open Eternity. From time immemorial, St. Luke had had the office of announcing, in Advent, the approach of the Last Judgment; the Evangelist St. Matthew was selected for this its second, and more detailed, description, on the last Sunday after Pentecost.

 

MASS

INTROIT
Dicit Dominus: Ego cogito cogitationes pacis, et non afflictionis: invocabitis me, et ego exaudiam vos: et reducam captivitatem vestram de cunctis locis. The Lord saith: I think thoughts of peace, and not of affliction; ye shall call upon me, and I will hear you: and bring back your captive people from all places.
Ps. Benedixisti, Domine, terram tuam: avertisti captivitatem Jacob. Gloria Patri. Dicit Dominus. Ps. Thou, O Lord, hast blessed thy land: thou hast brought back the captive children of Jacob. Glory, &c. The Lord.

The doing of good works, by the help of divine grace, prepares us to receive a still greater grace, for greater works in the future. In the Collect, let us unite with our Mother, the Church, in praying for an efficacious influence of the divine Mover upon our Wills.

 

COLLECT
Excita, quæsumus Domine, tuorum fidelium voluntates, ut divine operia fructum propensius exequentes, pietatis tuæ remedia majora percipiant. Per Dominum. Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy Faithful; that, becoming more zealous as to the fruit of the divine Work, they may receive the greater remedies of thy goodness. Through, etc.

The other Collects, as in the Fourth Sunday After Pentecost.

 

EPISTLE
LECTIO EPISTOLÆ BEATI PAULI APOSTOLI ad COLLOSENSES. LESSON of the EPISTLE of ST PAUL the APOSTLE to the COLOSSIANS.
Cap. I Ch. I
Fratres, Non cessamus pro vobis orantes, et postulantes ut impleamini agnitione voluntatis ejus, in omni sapientia et intellectu spiritali: ut ambuletis digne Deo per omnia placentes: in omni opere bono fructificantes, et crescentes in scientia Dei: in omni virtute confortati secundum potentiam claritatis ejus, in omni patientia et longanimitate cum gaudio, gratias agentes Deo Patri, qui dignos nos fecit in partem sortis sanctorum in lumine: qui eripuit nos de potestate tenebrarum, et transtulit in regnum filii dilectionis suæ, in quo habemus redemptionem per sanguinem ejus, remissionem peccatorum. Brethren: We cease not to pray for you, and to beg that you may be filled with the knowledge of his will, in all wisdom, and spiritual understanding: That you may walk worthy of God, in all things pleasing; being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God: Strengthened with all might, according to the power of his glory, in all patience and longsuffering with joy, Giving thanks to God the Father, who hath made us worthy to be partakers of the lot of the saints in light: Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of the Son of his love, In whom we have redemption through his blood, the remission of sins.

Thanksgiving, and Prayer! There we have the epitome of our Epistle, and an eloquent conclusion of the Apostle’s course of instructions: it is also both summary and conclusion of the Year of the sacred Liturgy. The Doctor of the Gentiles has been zealous beyond measure in his fulfillment of the task assigned to him by Mother Church. Of a certainty, the fault is not his if the souls her undertook to guide, on the morrow of the descent of the Spirit of Love, have not all reached that summit of perfection which he longed we should all get up to! Those who have gone bravely forward in the path which, a year since, was opened out to them by holy Church, now, by a happy experience, know that that path most surely leads them to the life of Union, where divine charity reigns supreme! Who is there that, with anything like earnestness, has allowed his mind and heart to take an interest in the several Liturgical Seasons, which have been brought before us and been celebrated by the Church during the past twelve months, has not also felt an immense increase of light imparted to him? Now, light is that indispensable element which delivers us from the power of darkness, and translates us, by the help of God, into the kingdom of the Son of his love. The work of redemption, which this his beloved Son came down upon earth to accomplish for his Father’s glory, could not do otherwise than make progress in those who have, with more or less fervor, entered into the spirit of his Church during the whole Year, that is, from the opening of Advent, right up to these the closing days of the sacred Cycle. All of us, then, whosoever we may be, should give thanks to this Father of Lights, who hath thus made us worthy to be partakers, somewhat at least, of the lot of the Saints.

So, then, all of us, be the share of such participation what it may—yes, all of us must pray, that the excellent gift which has been put into our hearts may fervent yield itself to the still richer development, which the coming new Cycle is intended to produce within us.

The just man cannot possibly remain stationary in this world; he must either descend or ascend; and whatever may be the degree of perfection to which grace has led him, he must be ever going still higher, as long as he is left in this life. The Colossians, to whom the Apostle was writing, had fully received the Gospel: the word of truth, which had been sown in them, had produced abundant fruit in faith, hope, and love: and yet, instead of relenting, on that account, his solicitude in their regard, it is precisely for that reason that St. Paul, who had prayed for them up to then, ceases not to go on praying for them. So let us do—let us go on praying. Let us beg of God that he will again, and always, fill us with his divine Wisdom, and with the Spirit of understanding. We need all that, in order to correspond with his merciful designs. If the new Year of the Church, which is so soon to begin, find us faithful and making fresh progress, we shall be repaid with new aspects of Truth in the garden of the Spouse, and the fruits we shall produce there will be more plentiful, and far sweeter, than in any bygone Year. Therefore, let us make up our minds to walk worthy of God “with dilated hearts,” and bravely, for the eye of his approving love will be ever upon us as we toil along. Oh, yes! let us run on in that uphill path which will lead us to eternal repose in the Beatific Vision!

 

GRADUAL
Liberasti nos, Domine, ex affligentibus nos: et eos, qui nos oderunt, confudisti. Thou hast saved us, O Lord, from them that afflict us: and hast put them to shame that hate us
℣. In Deo laudabimur tota die, et in nomine tuo confitebimur in sæcula. ℣. In God shall we glory all the day long; and, in thy name, we will give praise for ever.
Alleluia, alleluia. Alleluia, alleluia.
℣. De profundis clamavi ad te, Domine: Domine, exaudi orationem meam. Alleluia. ℣. Out of the depths I have cried unto thee, O Lord: Lord, hear my prayer. Alleluia.

 

GOSPEL
SEQUENTIA SANCTI EVANGELII SECUNDUM MATTHÆUM. SEQUEL of the HOLY GOSPEL ACCORDING to MATTHEW.
CAP. XXIV. CH. XXIV.
In illo tempore: Cum videritis abominationem desolationis, quæ dicta est a Daniele propheta, stantem in loco sancto, qui legit, intelligat: tunc qui in Judæa sunt, fugiant ad montes: et qui in tecto, non descendat tollere aliquid de domo sua: et qui in agro, non revertatur tollere tunicam suam. Vae autem prægnantibus et nutrientibus in illis diebus! Orate autem ut non fiat fuga vestra in hieme, vel sabbato: erit enim tunc tribulatio magna, qualis non fuit ab initio mundi usque modo, neque fiet. Et nisi breviati fuissent dies illi, non fieret salva omnis caro: sed propter electos breviabuntur dies illi. Tunc si quis vobis dixerit: Ecce hic est Christus, aut illic: nolite credere. Surgent enim pseudochristi, et pseudoprophetæ: et dabunt signa magna, et prodigia, ita ut in errorem inducantur (si fieri potest) etiam electi. Ecce prædixi vobis. Si ergo dixerint vobis: Ecce in deserto est, nolite exire; Ecce in penetralibus, nolite credere. Sicut enim fulgur exit ab oriente, et paret usque in occidentem: ita erit et adventus Filii hominis. Ubicumque fuerit corpus, illic congregabuntur et aquilæ. Statim autem post tribulationem dierum illorum sol obscurabitur, et luna non dabit lumen suum, et stellæ cadent de cælo, et virtutes cælorum commovebuntur: et tunc parebit signum Filii hominis in caelo: et tunc plangent omnes tribus terræ: et videbunt Filium hominis venientem in nubibus caeli cum virtute multa et majestate. Et mittet angelos suos cum tuba, et voce magna: et congregabunt electos ejus a quatuor ventis, a summis caelorum usque ad terminos eorum. Ab arbore autem fici discite parabolam: cum jam ramus ejus tener fuerit, et folia nata, scitis quia prope est aestas: ita et vos cum videritis haec omnia, scitote quia prope est, in januis. Amen dico vobis, quia non præteribit generatio haec, donec omnia hæc fiant. Cælum et terra transibunt, verba autem mea non præteribunt. At that time: Jesus said to his disciples: When you shall see the abomination of desolation, which was spoken of by Daniel the prophet, standing in the holy place: he that readeth let him understand. Then they that are in Judea, let them flee to the mountains: And he that is on the housetop, let him not come down to take any thing out of his house: And he that is in the field, let him not go back to take his coat. And woe to them that are with child, and that give suck in those days. But pray that your flight be not in the winter, or on the sabbath. For there shall be then great tribulation, such as hath not been from the beginning of the world until now, neither shall be. And unless those days had been shortened, no flesh should be saved: but for the sake of the elect those days shall be shortened. Then if any man shall say to you: Lo here is Christ, or there, do not believe him. For there shall arise false Christs and false prophets, and shall shew great signs and wonders, insomuch as to deceive (if possible) even the elect. Behold I have told it to you, beforehand. If therefore they shall say to you: Behold he is in the desert, go ye not out: Behold he is in the closets, believe it not. For as lightning cometh out of the east, and appeareth even into the west: so shall the coming of the Son of man be. Wheresoever the body shall be, there shall the eagles also be gathered together. And immediately after the tribulation of those days, the sun shall be darkened and the moon shall not give her light, and the stars shall fall from heaven, and the powers of heaven shall be moved: And then shall appear the sign of the Son of man in heaven: and then shall all tribes of the earth mourn: and they shall see the Son of man coming in the clouds of heaven with much power and majesty. And he shall send his angels with a trumpet, and a great voice: and they shall gather together his elect from the four winds, from the farthest parts of the heavens to the utmost bounds of them. And from the fig tree learn a parable: When the branch thereof is now tender, and the leaves come forth, you know that summer is nigh. So you also, when you shall see all these things, know ye that it is nigh, even at the doors. Amen I say to you, that this generation shall not pass, till all these things be done. Heaven and earth shall pass, but my words shall not pass.

Several times, during Advent, we meditated on the circumstances which are to accompany the Last Coming of Christ our Lord; and in a few days, the same great teachings will be again brought before us, filling our souls with a salutary fear. May we, then, be permitted, on this last Sunday of our Liturgical Year, to address ourselves in a prayer of desire and praise to our adorable Lord and King, the solemn honor whose Judgment is to be the consummation of his work, and the signal of his triumph.

Oh Jesus! who then art to come to deliver thy Church and avenge that God who has so long borne every sort of insult from his creature man, that day of thy coming will indeed be terrible to the sinner! He will then understand how the Lord hath made all things for himself, all, even the ungodly who, on the evil day, is to show forth the divine justice. The whole world, fighting on his side against the wicked shall then, at last, be avenged for that slavery of sin, which had been forced upon it. Vainly will the wicked cry out to the rocks to fall upon them and hide them from the face of him who then be seated on his throne: the abyss will refuse to engulf them: in obedience to him who holds the keys of death and hell, it will give forth, to a man, its wretched victims and set them at the foot of the dread tribunal. O Jesus, how magnificent will not thy power then appear! The heavenly hosts will also be standing around thee, forming thy brilliant court and assembling thy elect from the four quarters of the earth.

For we also, we thy redeemed, who had become thy members by becoming the members of thy beloved Church—we are to be there on that day, and our place, O ineffable mystery! is to be the one thou hast reserved for thy Bride, it is to be thy own throne, where seated, we shall judge the very angels. Even now, all those blessed of the Father, all those elect, whose youth, like that of the eagle, has been so often renewed by their receiving thy precious Blood—have they not had their eyes fitted to gaze, and without being dazzled, on the Sun of Justice, when he shall appear in the heavens? The tediousness of their long exile has given such keenness to their hunger that nothing will have power to stay their flight, once the sacred prey of thy divine Body shall be shown them! What hindrance could be strong enough to check the impetuosity of the love which will bring them all together to the banquet of the eternal Pasch? The trumpet of the Archangel, which will ring through the graves of the just, is to be a summons calling them not to death, but to life—to the sight of the old enemy’s destruction—to a redemption, which is to include their very bodies—to the unimpeded passover to the true Land of promise—in a word, to the Pasch, and this tie, quite real, and for all, and forever. What will not be the joy of that true Day of the Lord!—what joy for them that have, by faith, lived in Christ and loved him without seeing him! Identifying themselves with thee, O Jesus, notwithstanding the weakness of the flesh, they have continued here below thy life of suffering and humiliation: what a triumph when, delivered forever from sin and vested in their immortal bodies, they shall be borne aloft before thy face, that they may forever be with thee!

But their chief joy on that great Day will be to assist at the glorification of their most dear Lord by the manifestation of the power which was given to him over all flesh. It is to be then, O Emmanuel! that, crushing the heads of kings and making thine enemies thy footstool, thou wilt be shown as the one Ruler of all nations. It is to be then that heaven and earth and hell will bow their knee before that Son of Man who heretofore appeared on earth as a slave, and was judged and condemned and put to death between two thieves; it is to be then, dear Jesus, that thou wilt judge the unjust judges, to whom, even in the midst of all the humiliations they put on thee, thou didst foretell this thy Coming on the clouds of heaven. And when, after the irrevocable sentence has been passed, the wicked shall go to everlasting torments and the just to life eternal, thy Apostle tells us that having conquered thine enemies and been proclaimed undisputed King, thou wilt consign to thy eternal Father this thy Kingdom won over death; it will be the perfect homage of thee, the Head, and of all thy faithful members. God will thus be all in all. It will be the perfect accomplishment of that sublime prayer thou taughtest mankind to make, which they daily offer up to the Father who is in heaven, and say to him: Hallowed be thy name! Thy Kingdom come! Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven! O blissfully peaceful Day, when blasphemy is to cease, and when this poor earth of ours, cleansed by fire from the filth of sin, shall be turned into a new paradise! Where, then, is the Christian, who would not thrill with emotion at the thought of that last of all the Days of time, which is to usher in beautiful Eternity? Who would not despise the agonies of his own last hour, when he reflects that those sufferings have really only one meaning in them—that is, as the Gospel words it, that the Son of Man is nigh even at the very doors!

O sweet Jesus, detach us, every Year, more and more from this world, whose fashion passeth away, with its vain toils, its false glories, and its lying pleasures. It was thine own foretelling that, as in the days of Noe and Sodom, men will go on with their feasting and business and amusements, without giving any more thought to thy approaching Coming than their forefathers heeded the threat of the Deluge, or of the fire which came upon them and destroyed them. Let these men go on with their merry-making and their sending gifts one to the other, as thine Apocalypse expresses it, because, so they will have it, Christ and his Church are then to be worn-out ideas! While they are tyrannizing over thy holy City in a thousand varied ways, and persecuting her as no past period had ever done, they little think that all this is an announcement of the Eternal Nuptials, which are nigh at hand. All these trials were the fresh jewels which the Bride was to have on her before all her beauty was complete; and the blood of her last Martyrs was to incarnadine her already splendid robes with all the richness of royal crimson. As for us, we lend an ear to the echoes of our home above; and from the throne of our God, we hear going forth the voice heard by thy beloved Prophet of Patmos: Give praise unto our God, all ye his servants, and ye that fear him, little and great! Alleluia! For the Lord our God the almighty hath reigned! Let us be glad and rejoice, and give glory unto him; for the Marriage of the Lamb is come, and his Wife hath prepared herself! Yet a little while till the number of our brethren be made up, and then, with the Spirit and the Bride, we will say to thee, in all the ardor of our souls that have long thirsted after thee: Come, Lord Jesus! Come, and perfect us in love, by Union eternal, unto the glory of the Father, and of thyself the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, forever and ever!

 

OFFERTORY
De profundis clamavi ad te, Domine: Domine, exaudi orationem meam: de profundis clamavi ad te, Domine. Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Lord: Lord, hear my prayer: out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Lord!

In the Secret, let us ask of God that on the approach of the Last Judgment, he turn all hearts towards himself, and vouchsafe to make our earthly desires give place to the desire for, and relish of, heavenly things.

 

SECRET
Propitius esto, Domine, supplicationibus nostris: et populi tui oblationibus precibusque susceptis, omnium nostrum ad te corda converte; ut a terrenis cupiditatibus liberati, ad cœlestia desideria transeamus. Per Dominum. Mercifully hear our supplications, O Lord: and, having received the offerings and prayers of thy people, turn the hearts of us all unto thee; that, being freed from earthly desires, we may come to desire heavenly things. Through, etc.

The other Secrets, as in the Fourth Sunday After Pentecost.

 

COMMUNION
Amen dico vobis, quidquid orantes petitis, credite quia acciepietis, et fiet vobis. Amen I say unto you,—all things whatsoever ye ask for when ye pray, believe that ye shall receive, and it shall be done unto you.

May the divine Sacrament, as is the Church’s petition in the Postcommunion, fully cure, by its virtue, whatsoever there may remain faulty in our souls, at this close of the Year!

 

POSTCOMMUNION
Concede nobis, quæsumus Domine, ut per hæc sacramenta, quæ sumpsimus, quidquid in nostra mente vitiosum est, ipsorum medicationis dono curetur. Per Dominum. Grant, we beseech thee, O Lord, that whatsoever be faulty in our souls, may be cured by the virtue of the mysteries we have received. Through, etc.

 

SSPX-MC
SSPX-MC
Sermons
Sermons
Catacombs
Catacombs
Contact
Contact
Fr. Hewko
Fr. Hewko

Sanctuary Lamp Sponsorship  
Please send your name HERE
Suggested Offering: $20.00 

Chapel Email List Subscription
Please send your email address to:
ourladyofatimachapel@gmail.com

OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHAPEL
16 DOGWOOD ROAD SOUTH
HUBBARDSTON, MA 01452

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Our Lady of Fátima Chapel
     Massachusetts Mission of the SSPX-MC


              

Saint Josaphat, Bishop & Martyr
Feast Day Today – November 14th

Josaphat Kuncewicz was born of noble Catholic parents at Vladimir in Volhynia. When a child, as he was listening to his mother telling him about the Passion of Christ, a dart issued form the image of Jesus crucified and wounded him in the heart. Set on fire with the love of God, he began to devote himself with such zeal to prayer and other works of piety, that he was the admiration and the model of his older companions. At the age of twenty he became a monk under the Rule of St. Basil, and made wonderful progress in evangelical perfection. He went barefoot, even in the severe winter of that country; he never ate meat, drank wine only when obliged by obedience, and wore a rough hair-shirt until his death. The flower of his chastity, which he had vowed in early youth to the Virgin Mother of God, he preserved unspotted. He soon became so renowned for virtue and learning, that in spite of his youth he was made superior of the monastery of Byten; soon afterwards he became Archimandrite of Vilna; and lastly, much against his will, but to the great joy of Catholics, he was chosen Archbishop of Polock.

In this dignity he relaxed nothing of his former manner of life; and had nothing so much at heart as the divine service and the salvation of the sheep entrusted to him. He energetically defended Catholic faith and unity, and labored to the utmost of his power to bring back schismatics and heretics to communion with the See of blessed Peter. The Sovereign Pontiff and the plenitude of his power he never ceased to defend, both by preaching, and by writings full of piety and learning, against the most shameless calumnies and errors of the wicked. He vindicated episcopal rights, and restored ecclesiastical possessions which had been seized by laymen. Incredible was the number of heretics he won back to the bosom of Mother Church; and the words of the Popes bear witness how greatly he promoted the union of the Greek and Latin churches. His revenues were entirely expended in restoring the beauty of God’s house, in building dwellings for consecrated virgins, and in other pious works. So bountiful was he to the poor that, on one occasion having nothing wherewith to supply the needs of a certain widow, he ordered his Omophorion or episcopal pallium to be pawned.

The great progress made by the Catholic faith so stirred up the hatred of wicked men against the soldier of Christ, that they determined to put him to death. He knew what was threatening him; and foretold it when preaching to the people. As he was making his pastoral visitation at Vitebsk, the murderers broke into his house, striking and wounding all whom they found. Josaphat meekly went to meet them, and accosted them kindly, saying: My little children, why do you strike my servants? If you have any complaint against me, here I am. Hereupon they rushed on him, overwhelmed him with blows, pierced him with their spears, and at length dispatched him with an axe and threw his body into the river. This took place on the twelfth of November 1623, in the forty-third year of his age. His body surrounded with a miraculous light was rescued from the waters. The martyr’s blood won a blessing first of all for his murderers; for, being condemned to death, they nearly all abjured their schism and repented of their crime. As the death of this great bishop was followed by many miracles, Pope Urban VIII granted him the honors of beatification. On the third of the Calends of July, 1867, when celebrating the centenary of the Princes of the Apostles, Pius IX in the Vatican basilica, in presence of the College of Cardinals, and of about five hundred Patriarchs, Metropolitans, and Bishops of every rite, assembled from all parts of the world, solemnly enrolled among the Saints this great defender of the Church’s unity, who was the first Oriental to be thus honored. Pope Leo XIII extended his Mass and Office to the universal Church. – From the Roman Breviary

________________________________________________

This Week’s Holy Mass Schedule

There are no Holy Masses scheduled at the Chapel this week as Father is on an extended Western mission circuit. The Mass schedule will resume next week.
 

Today – Sunday, November 14th
Twenty-fifth Sunday After Pentecost
Saint Josaphat, Bishop & Martyr

Holy Mass Livestream from San Diego, CA – 12:30 PM EST
Find Link Here

Monday, November 15th
Saint Albert the Great, Bishop & Doctor

Tuesday, November 16th
Saint Gertrude, Virgin

Wednesday, November 17th
Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus, Bishop & Confessor

Thursday, November 18th
Dedication of the Basilicas of Saints Peter and Paul

Friday, November 19th
Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, Widow

Saturday, November 20th
Saint Felix of Valois, Confessor

________________________________________________


Sorrowful Heart of Mary Oratory Fund-Raiser
Invest in the Future of the Traditional Catholic Priesthood

“Operation Survival” 
See Details Here

________________________________________________

XXV Sunday After Pentecost
Mass of the VI Sunday After the Epiphany

I will open my mouth in parables, I will utter things hidden from the foundation of the world. – Matthew xiii:35

 


MASS

 

INTROIT

Adorate Deum omnes Angeli ejus: audivit et laetata est Sion: et exsultaverunt filiae Judae.
Ps. Domninus regnavit; exsultet terra, laetentur insulae multae. V. Gloria Patri. Adorate.
Adore God, all ye his Angels: Sion heard and was glad, and the daughters of Juda rejoiced.
Ps. The Lord hath reigned let the earth rejoice, let many islands be glad. V. Glory, &c. Adore.

 

COLLECT

Praesta quaesumus omnipotens Deus: ut semper rationabilia meditantes, quae tibi sunt placita, et dictis exsequamur et factis. Per Dominum. Grant, we beseech thee, O Almighty God, that being always intent upon what is reasonable and just, we may, both in word and deed, perform what is acceptable to thee. Through, the.

 

EPISTLE

Lectio Epistolae beati Pauli Apostoli ad Thessalonicenses.I. Cap. i.
Fratres, gratias agimus Deo semper pro omnibus vobis, memoriam vestri facientes in orationibus nostris sine intermissione, memores operis fidei vestrae, et laboris, et charitatis, et sustinentiae spei Domini nostri Jesu Christi, ante Deum et Patrem nostrum: scientes, fratres dilecti a Deo, electionem vestram: quia Evangelium nostrum non fuit ad vos in sermone tantum, sed et in virtute, et in Spiritu Sancto, et in plenitudine multa, sicut scitis quales fuerimus in vobis propter vos. Et vos imitatores nostri facti estis et Domini, excipientes verbum in tribulatione multa, cum gaudio Spiritus Sancti: ita ut facti sitis forma omnibus credentibus in Macedonia, et in Achaia. A vobis enim diffamatus est sermo Domini, non solum in Macedonia, et in Achaia, sed et in omni loco fides vestra, quae est ad Deum, profecta est, ita ut non sit nobis necesse quidquam loqui. Ipsi enim de nobis annuntiant qualem introitum habuerimus ad vos: et quomodo conversi estis ad Deum a simulacris, servire Deo vivo, et vero, et exspectare Filium ejus de coelis (quem suscitavit ex mortuis) Jesum, qui eripuit nos ab ira ventura.
Lesson of the Epistle of Saint Paul the Apostle to the Thessalonians.I. Ch. i.
Brethren, we give thanks to God always for you all making a remembrance of you in our prayers without ceasing being mindful of you in the work of your faith, and labour, and charity, and of the enduring of the hope of our Lord Jesus Christ, before God and our Father; knowing, brethren beloved of God, your election. For our Gospel hath not been to you in word only, but in power also, and in the Holy Ghost, and in much fulness, as you know what manner of men we have been among you for your sakes. And you became followers of us, and of the Lord, receiving the word in much tribulation, with joy of the Holy Ghost; so that you were made a pattern to all that believe, in Macedonia and in Achaia. For from you was spread abroad the word of the Lord, not only in Macedonia and in Achaia, but also in every place your faith, which is towards God, is gone forth, so that we need not speak any thing. For they themselves relate of us, what manner of entering in we had unto you; and how you turned to God from idols, to serve the living and true God, and to wait for his Son from heaven (whom he raised up from the dead) Jesus, who hath delivered us from the wrath to come.

The praise which the Apostle here gives to the Thessalonians for their fervor in the faith, they had embraced, conveys a reproach to the Christians of our own times. These neophytes of Thessalonica, who, a short time before, were worshippers of idols, had become so earnest in the practice of the Christian religion, that even the Apostle is filled with admiration. We are the descendants of countless Christian ancestors; we received our regeneration by Baptism at our first coming into the world; we were taught the doctrine of Jesus Christ from our earliest childhood; and yet, our faith is not as strong, or our lives as holy, as were those of the early Christians. Their main occupation was the serving the living and true God, and the waiting for the coming of their Saviour; our Hope is precisely the same as that which made their hearts so fervent; how comes it that our Faith is not like theirs in its generosity? We love this present life, as though we had not the firm conviction that it is to pass away.

As far as depends upon us, we are handing down to future generations a Christianity very different from that which our Saviour established, which the Apostles preached, and which the pagans of the first ages thought they were bound to purchase at any price or sacrifice.

GRADUAL

Timebunt gentes Nomen tuum, Domine, et omnes reges terrae gloriam tuam.
V. Quoniam aedificavit Dominus Sion, et videbitur in majestate sua.Alleluia, alleluia.
V. Dominus regnavit: exsultet terra, laetentur insulae multae.
Alleluia.
The Gentiles shall fear thy Name, O Lord, and all the kings of the earth thy glory.
V. For the Lord hath built up Sion, and he shall be seen in his glory.Alleluia. alleluia.
V. The Lord hath reigned: let the earth rejoice: let many islands be glad.
Alleluia.

 

 

GOSPEL

Sequentia sancti Evangelii secundum Matthaeum.Cap. xiii.
In illo tempore: Dixit Jesus turbis parabolam hanc: Simile est regnum coelorum grano sinapis, quod accipiens homo seminavit in agro suo, quod minimum quidem est omnibus seminibus: cum autem creverit, majus est omnibus oleribus, et fit arbor, ita ut volucres coeli veniant, et habitent in ramis ejus. Aliam parabolam locutus est eis. Simile est regnum coelorum fermento, quod acceptum mulier abscondit in farinae satis tribus, donec fermentatum est totum. Haec omnia locutus est Jesus in parabolis ad turbas: et sine parabolis non loquebatur eis: ut impleretur quod dictum erat per Prophetam dicentem: Aperiam in parabolis os meum, eructabo abscondita a constitutione mundi.

Sequel of the holy Gospel according to Matthew. 

Ch. xiii.
At that time: Jesus spoke to the multitude this parable: The kingdom of heaven is like to a grain of mustard-seed, which, a man took and sowed in his field. Which indeed is the least of all seeds; but when it is grown up, it is greater than all herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come and dwell in the branches thereof. Another parable he spoke to them: The kingdom of heaven is like to leaven, which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal, until the whole was leavened. All these things Jesus spoke in parables to the multitudes, and without parables he did not speak to them; that the word might be fulfilled which was spoken by the Prophet, saying: I will open my mouth in parables, I will utter things hidden from the foundation of the world.

Our Lord here teaches us, under the symbolism of two parables, what we are to believe concerning his Church, which is his Kingdom, – a Kingdom that rises indeed here on the earth, but is to be perfected in Heaven. What is this grain of mustard-seed, which is hid under ground, is unseen by man’s eye, then appears as the least of herbs, but, finally, becomes a tree? It is the Word of God, at first hidden in Judea, trampled on by man’s malice even so as to be buried in a tomb, but, at length, rising triumphantly and reaching rapidly to every part of the world. Scarcely had a hundred years elapsed since Jesus was put to death, and his Church was vigorous even far beyond the limits of the Roman Empire. During the past nineteen centuries, every possible effort has been made to up-root the Tree of God; persecution, diplomacy, human wisdom, – all have tried, and all have but wasted their time. True, – they succeeded, from time to time, in severing a branch; but another grew in its place, for the sap of the Tree is vigorous beyond measure. The birds that come and dwell upon it, are, as the Holy Fathers interpret it, the souls of men aspiring to the eternal goods of the better world. If we are worthy of our name of “Christians,” we shall love this Tree, and find our rest and safety no where but beneath its shade. – The Woman, of whom the second parable speaks, is the Church, our Mother. It was she that, from the commencement of Christianity, took the teaching of her Divine Master, and hid it in the very heart of men, making it the leaven of their salvation. The three measures of meal which she leavened into bread, are the three great families of mankind, the three that came from the children of Noah, who are the three fathers of the whole human race. Let us love this Mother of ours; and let us bless that heavenly leaven, which made us become children of God, by making us children of the Church.

 

OFFERTORY

Dextera Domini fecit virtutem, dextera Domini exaltavit me: non moriar, sed vivam, et narrabo opera Domini. The right hand of the Lord hath wrought strength, the right hand of the Lord hath exalted me: I shall not die, but live, and shall declare the works of the Lord.

 

SECRET

Haec nos oblatio, Deus, mundet, quaesumus, et renovet, gubernet, et protegat. Per Dominum. May this oblation, O God, we beseech thee, cleanse, renew, govern, and protect us. Through. &c.

 

COMMUNION

Mirabantur omnes de his, quae procedebant de ore Dei. All wondered at the words that came from the mouth of God.

 

POSTCOMMUNION

Coelestibus, Domine, pasti deliciis, quaesumus, ut semper eadem, per quae veraciter vivimus, appetamus. Per Dominum. Being fed,  Lord, with heavenly dainties, we beseech thee, that we may always hunger after them, for by them we have true life. Through, &c.
 
 
 
 
SSPX-MC
SSPX-MC
Sermons
Sermons
Catacombs
Catacombs
Contact
Contact
Fr. Hewko
Fr. Hewko
Sanctuary Lamp Sponsorship
Please send your name HERE
Suggested Offering: $20.00

Chapel Email List Subscription
Please send your email address to:
ourladyofatimachapel@gmail.com

OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHAPEL
16 DOGWOOD ROAD SOUTH
HUBBARDSTON, MA 01452

 
 
 
   Our Lady of Fátima Chapel
     Massachusetts Mission of the SSPX-MC


              

Dedication of the Archbasilica of Our Savior
Feast Day – Tuesday, November 9th

As the anniversary of the dedication of a cathedral is kept as a solemn festival in all the churches of a diocese, so the dedication of the Church of Saint John Lateran, the cathedral of the Supreme Pontiff, is everywhere celebrated. The first mention of the Lateran in ecclesiastical history is that of Optatus of Milevis who relates that a council against the Donatists was held within its walls. About this time Constantine gave to the Church of Rome the ancient Palace of the Laterani, part of the dowry of his wife, Fausta. From that time onwards the Lateran became the ordinary residence of the Popes, and may be regarded as a memorial of that long series of holy Pontiffs who inhabited it during the course of nearly ten centuries. Those walls, now nearly two thousand years old, have seen many important events in history and have figured in poetry and in art, whllst they sheltered a dynasty of Pontiffs who ruled longer than any dynasty of kings. Here, at the suggestion of Pope Sylvester, Constantine the Great transformed or constructed the first basilica dedicated to the Savior at Rome. In the Twelfth Century, on account of the baptistery, it was dedicated to Saint John the Baptist and began to be called Saint John Lateran. In the early Middle Ages the Pope officiated, not at one church only, but in all the basilicas and titles within and without the city. On great solemnities and for ordinations and coronations, he officiated at Saint Peter’s. When the observance of the stations declined, the Lateran was ranked as the Papal residence, and the basilica was looked upon as a cathedral with regard to the other titular churches of the city. As papal cathedral and mother of all the churches, the Basilica of the Savior has been clothed with the dignity of a symbol of the Pontifical authority in the eyes of the Catholic world. The Liturgy has also concentrated in her ritual this belief held by the household of the faith, and Pope Saint Pius X raised the feast which we celebrate on November 9th to the same rank of a double of the second class for the entire Latin Church, as is held by the great feasts of the religious year. In this basilica and the Lantern Palace five ecumenical councils were held, besides twenty synods. The basilica, after its destruction, was rebuilt by Benedict XIII and consecrated on November 9th, 1726. Since that time the feast has been kept in the Universal Church. The dedication of a church is an important liturgical event. It is not the same thing to pray in private, or to pray in the sacred sanctuary and to take part in the rites of Catholic Liturgy. By reason of its consecration the Church is the throne of God’s mercy, the place chosen by Him, and where He chiefly condescends to work our salvation. Here we know He listens to our prayers; here Christ is pleased to receive from the assembly of believers that solemn, public, and united adoration which is due to Him. – The Roman Missal

__________________________________________

This Week’s Holy Mass Schedule

Today – Sunday, November 7th – 9:30 AM
XXIV Sunday After Pentecost
Within the Octave of All Saints

Today’s Holy Mass LiveStream from MA
Find Link Here

Wednesday, November 10th – 5:30 PM
Saint Andrew Avellino, Confessor

Thursday, November 11th – 7:30 AM
Saint Martin of Tours, Bishop & Confessor

Friday, November 12th – 7:30 AM
Saint Martin I, Pope and Martyr

Confessions / Rosary – 30 Minutes Before Mass

__________________________________________


Sorrowful Heart of Mary Oratory Fund-Raiser
Invest in the Future of the Traditional Catholic Priesthood

“Operation Survival” 
See Details Here

__________________________________________

XXIV Sunday After Pentecost 
Mass of the Fifth Sunday After Epiphany

Preserve, we beseech thee, O Lord, thy family by thy constant mercy, that we who confide solely in the support of thy heavenly grace, may be always defended by thy protection. – Collect of the Mass

MASS

INTROIT

Adorate Deum omnes Angeli ejus: audivit et laetata est Sion: et exsultaverunt filiae Judae.
Ps. Dominus regnavit: exsultet terra, laetentur insulae multae. V. Gloria Patri. Adorate.
Adore God, all ye his Angels: Sion heard and was glad, and the daughters of Juda rejoiced.
Ps. The Lord hath reigned; let the earth rejoice, let many islands be glad. V. Glory. Adore.

COLLECT

Familiam tuam, quaesumus Domine, continua pietate custodi: ut quae in sola spe gratiae coelestis innititur, tua semper protectione muniatur. Per Dominum. Preserve, we beseech thee, O Lord, thy family by thy constant mercy, that we who confide solely in the support of thy heavenly grace, may be always defended by thy protection. Through, &c.

SECOND COLLECT

A cunctis nos, quaesumus Domine, mentis et corporis defende periculis: et intercedente beata et gloriosa semper Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo atque beato N. et omnibus Sanctis, salutem nobis tribue benignus et pacem; ut destructis adversitatibus et erroribus universis, Ecclesia tua secura tibi serviat libertate. Preserve us, O Lord, we beseech thee, from all dangers of soul and body: and by the intercession of the glorious and blessed Mary the ever Virgin-Mother of God, of thy blessed Apostles, Peter and Paul, of blessed N., (here is mentioned the Titular Saint of the Church,) and of all the Saints, grant us in thy mercy, health and peace; that all adversities and errors being removed, thy Church may serve thee with undisturbed liberty.

A third Collect is added, at the choice of the Priest.

EPISTLE

Lectio Epistolae beati Pauli Apostoli ad Colossenses. Cap. III.
Fratres, induite vos, sicut electi Dei, sancti, et dilecti, viscera misericordiae, benignitatem, humilitatem, modestiam, patientiam supportantes invicem, et donantes vobismetipsis, si quis adversus aliquem habet querelam: sicut et Dominus donavit vobis, ita et vos. Super omnia autem haec, charitatem habete, quod est vinculum perfectionis: et pax Christi exsultet in cordibus vestris, in qua et vocati estis in uno corpore; et grati estote. Verbum Christi habitet in vobis abundanter, in omni sapientia, docentes, et commonentes vosmetipsos, psalmis, hymnis, et canticis spiritualibus, in gratia cantantes in cordibus vestris Deo. Omne quodcumque facitis, in verbo aut in opere, omnia in nomine Domini nostri Jesu Christi, gratias agentes Deo et Patri per Jesum Christum Dominum nostrum.
Lesson of the Epistle of St.  Paul the Apostle to the Colossians.Ch. III.
Brethren, put ye on therefore as the elect of God, holy, and beloved, the bowels of mercy, benignity, humility, modesty, patience; bearing with one another, and forgiving one another, if any have a complaint against another, even as the Lord hath forgiven you, so you also. But above all these things have charity, which is the bond of perfection; and let the peace of Christ rejoice in your hearts, wherein also you are called in one body; and be ye thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you abundantly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms, hymns, and spiritual canticles, singing in grace in your hearts to God. All whatsoever you do in word, or in work, all things do ye in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ giving thanks to God and the Father, through Jesus Christ our Lord.

The Christian, – trained as he has been in the school of the Man-God, who deigned to dwell upon this earth, – should ever show mercy towards his fellow-men. This world, which has been purified by the presence of the Incarnate Word, would become an abode of Peace, if we were but to live in such manner as to merit the titles, given us by the Apostle, of elect of God, holy, and beloved. The Peace here spoken of should, first of all, fill the heart of every Christian, and give it an uninterrupted joy, which would be ever pouring itself forth in singing the praises of God. But it is mainly on the Sundays, that the Faithful, by taking part with the Church in her psalms, hymns, and spiritual canticles, fulfill this duty so dear to their hearts. Let us, moreover, in our every day life, practice the advice given us by the Apostle, – of doing all things in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, in order that we may, in all things, find favor with our Heavenly Father.

GRADUAL

Timebunt gentes Nomen tuum, Domine, et omnes regas terrae gloriam tuam.
V. Quondam aedificavit Dominus Sion, et videbitur in majestate sua.Alleluia, alleluia.
V. Dominus regnavit: exsultet terra, laetentur insulae multae.
Alleluia.
The Gentiles shall fear thy Name, O Lord, and all the kings of the earth thy glory.
V. For the Lord hath built up Sion, and he shall be seen in his glory.Alleluia, alleluia.
V. The Lord hath reigned, let the earth rejoice; let many islands be glad.
Alleluia.

GOSPEL

Sequentia sancti Evangelii secundum Matthaeum.Cap. XIII.

In illo tempore: Dixit Jesus turbis parabolam hanc. Simile factum est regnum coelorum homini, qui seminavit bonum semen in agro suo. Cum autem dormirent homines, venit inimicus ejus, et superseminavit zizania in medio tritici, et abiit. Cum autem crevisset herba, et fructum fecisset, tunc apparuerunt et zizania. Accedentes autem servi patrisfamilias, dixerunt ei: Domine, nonne bonum semen seminasti in agro tuo? Unde ergo habet zizania: Et ait illis: Inimicus homo hoc fecit. Servi autem dixerunt ei: Vis, imus et colligimus ea? Et ait: Non: ne forte colligentes zizania, eradicetis simul et triticum. Sinite utraque crescere usque ad messem, et in tempore messis dicam messoribus: Colligite primum zizania, et alligate ea in fasiculos ad comburendum, triticum autem congregate in horreum meum.

Sequel of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew.Ch. XIII.

At that time: Jesus spoke this parable to the multitude, saying: The kingdom of heaven is likened to a man that sowed good seed in his field. But while men were asleep, his enemy came and over-sowed cockle among the wheat and went his way. And when the blade was sprung up, and brought forth fruit, then appeared also the cockle. Then the servants of the good man of the house, coming said to him: Sir, didst thou not sow good seed in thy field? whence then hath it cockle? And he said to them: An enemy hath done this. And the servants said to him: Wilt thou that we go and gather it up? And he said: No, lest perhaps gathering up the cockle, you root up the wheat also together with it. Let both grow until the harvest, and in the time of harvest I will say to the reapers, Gather up first the cockle, and bind it in bunches to burn, but the wheat gather ye into my barn.

The Kingdom of Heaven, here spoken of by our Lord, is the Church Militant,- the society of them that believe in him. And yet, the field he has tilled with so much care is over-sowed with cockle; heresies have crept in, scandals have abounded; are we, on that account, to have misgivings about the foresight of the Master, who knows all things, and without whose permission nothing happens? Far from us be such a thought! He himself tells us that these things must needs be. Man has been gifted with free-will; it is for him to choose between good and evil; but, God will turn all to his own greater glory. Heresies, then, like weeds in a field, may spring up in the Church; but the day must come when they will be uprooted; some of them will wither on the parent-stems, but the whole cockle shall be gathered into bundles to burn. Where are now the heresies that sprang up in the first ages of the Church? And in another hundred years, what will have become of the heresy, which, under the pretentious name of The Reformation, has caused incalculable evil? It is the same with the scandals which rise up within the pale of the Church; – they are a hard trial; but trials must come. The Divine Husbandman wills not that this cockle be torn up, lest the wheat should suffer injury. First of all, the mixture of good and bad is an advantage; it teaches the good not to put their hopes in man, but in God. Then too, the mercy of our Lord is so great, that at times the very cockle is converted, by Divine grace, into wheat. We must, therefore, have patience. But, whereas it is when the men are asleep that the enemy over-sows the field with cockle, it behooves us to pray for Pastors, and ask their Divine Master to bless them with that Vigilance, which is the primary condition of the flock being safe, and is so essential a quality in every Bishop, that his very name is, – one who watches.

OFFERTORY

Dextera Domini fecit virtutem, dextera Domine exaltavit me: non moriar, sed vivam, et narrabo opera Domini. The right hand of the Lord hath wrought strength, the right hand of the Lord hath exalted mine: I shall not die, but live, and shall declare the works of the Lord.

SECRET

Hostias tibi, Domine, placationis offerimus, ut et delicta nostra miseratus absolvas, et nutantia corda tu dirigas. Per Dominum. We offer thee, O Lord, this sacrifice of propitiation, that thou wouldst mercifully forgive us our sins, and guide our faltering hearts. Through, &c.

SECOND SECRET

Exaudi nos, Deus Salutaris noster, ut per hujus Sacramenti virtutem, a cunctis nos mentis et corporis hostibus tuearis, gratiam tribuens in praesenti, et gloriam in futuro. Graciously grant us, O God our Saviour, that by virtue of this Sacrament, thou mayest defend us from all enemies, both of soul and body; giving us grace in this life, and glory in the next.

A third Secret, at the choice of the Priest, is added.

COMMUNION

Mirabantur omnes de his, quae procedebant de ore Dei. All wondered at the words that came from the mouth of God.

POSTCOMMUNION

Quaesumus, omnipotens Deus, ut illius salutaris capiamus effectum, cujus per haec mysteria pignus accepimus. Per Dominum. We beseech thee, O Almighty God, that we may some day receive the effects of that salvation, of which we have received the pledge in these mysteries. Through, &c.

SECOND POSTCOMMUNION.

Mundet et muniat nos, quaesumus, Domine, divini Sacramenti munus oblatum: et, intercedente beata Virgine Dei genitrice Maria, cum beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, atque beato N. et omnibus Sanctis, a cunctis nos reddat et perversitatibus expiatos, et adversitatibus expeditos. May the oblation of this divine Sacrament, we beseech thee, O Lord, both cleanse and defend us; and, by the intercession of Blessed Mary, the Virgin-Mother of God, together with that of thy blessed Apostles, Peter and Paul, as likewise of blessed N., and of all the Saints, free us from all sin, and deliver us from all adversity.

The third Postcommunion is at the choice of the Priest.

 
SSPX-MC
SSPX-MC
Sermons
Sermons
Catacombs
Catacombs
Contact
Contact
Fr. Hewko
Fr. Hewko
Sanctuary Lamp Sponsorship
Please send your name HERE
Suggested Offering: $20.00
Chapel Email List Subscription
Please send your email address to:
ourladyofatimachapel@gmail.com

OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHAPEL
16 DOGWOOD ROAD SOUTH
HUBBARDSTON, MA 01452

 
 
   Our Lady of Fátima Chapel
     Massachusetts Mission of the SSPX-MC

 


              

 

 

All Souls Day 
Today – November 2nd

Requiem æternam dona eis Domine:
et lux perpetua luceat eis

Three (3) Consecutive Holy Masses Today – 5:00 PM
Confessions / Rosary – 30 Minutes Before Mass

How to Obtain a Plenary Indulgence for the Holy Souls

On All Souls Day:
From Noon yesterday November 1st, until Midnight today November 2nd, a plenary indulgence applicable only to the Poor Souls is granted to those who visit any Catholic church or public oratory and recite the Our Father and the Apostles Creed.

On Each Day of the All Saints Octave – November 1st to November 8th:
A plenary indulgence applicable only to the Poor Souls is granted to those who visit a cemetery and pray (even if only mentally) for the faithful departed during the octave of the feast of All Saints.

– Conditions for Indulgences –

+ Only one plenary indulgence can be granted per day.

+ It is necessary to be in the state of grace (at least by completion of the work).

+ Freedom from attachment to sin (even venial sin; meaning attachment to a particular sin, not sin in general; otherwise the indulgence is only partial).

+ Confession (8) eight days before or after the indulgenced act.

+ Holy Communion (8) eight days before or after the indulgenced act.

+ Prayers for the intentions of the Supreme Pontiff.

+ + + + + + +

Instructions for All Souls Day
By Rev. Fr. Leonard Goffine, 1871

 Read Here

 

+ + + + + + +

 
November – Consecrated to the Holy Souls

During this entire month, Holy Mother Church asks Her children to offer special prayer, sacrifice, fasting and almsgiving for the remission of debt incurred by the faithful departed whose sins have already been pardoned.

Our Lady of Fatima Chapel is accepting the names of the deceased throughout this month. These names are placed on the altar to be remembered at the commemoratio pro defunctis of every Holy Mass offered both here, and at each Sorrowful Heart of Mary mission, wherever the Holy Sacrifice is scheduled to be offered by the Apostolate, for the entire month of November. These names will also be prayed for during the recitation of our Chapel Rosary.

Please submit the names of the deceased to:

By Email:
ourladyofatimachapel@gmail.com
 
By Postal Mail:
Our Lady of Fatima Chapel
16 Dogwood Road South
Hubbardston, MA 01452
 

In charity, let us pray earnestly for the dead throughout November. There are so many great graces available if we only take advantage of the opportunity to relieve the suffering souls; especially in this time of crisis when prayers for the deceased have greatly diminished in number and in fervor. 

+ + + + + + +

The Duration of Purgatory

“It is a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead,
that they may be loosed from their sins.” – 2 Mach., xii. 46

 
 

Concerning the duration of Purgatory, the Church simply tells us that it is not a place of everlasting pain, but will end at the last judgment; neither are we informed of the length of time required for the purification of a soul.

According to Saint Thomas Aquinas, the soul, to be reunited to her Creator in Heaven, must be in the state of primitive innocence which adorned her when she proceeded from His hand. The image of God must be entirely restored within her, commensurate with the degree of glory awaiting her in Heaven.

From this it is evident that the suffering souls cannot enter Heaven until perfectly cleansed, either by their pains or by the suffrages of the faithful. They suffer until entirely purified, until the last farthing of their debt is paid. Increased and intensified pain will probably supply the want of time for the souls who will not have rendered full satisfaction before the last day.

Our Duty to Relieve the Holy Souls

In bestowing charity upon any person, we are usually guided by the degree of his poverty; but who is in such great need as he who possesses absolutely nothing, owes a heavy debt, is unable to labor or gain any merit; or even to beg, and must nevertheless suffer the most excruciating torments until the last farthing has been paid?

There is a universal law to assist the needy, which extends even to strangers; but here the obligation is greater, because among these souls in Purgatory are such as were intimately connected with us, who suffer perhaps, for having loved us excessively. Among the sufferers are our fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, relatives and friends.

How exceedingly painful for them to be forgotten and deserted even by those whose happiness they promoted during their sojourn on earth; to see the possessions left to their children foolishly squandered, they themselves not receiving the benefit of the least farthing thereof. What proof of extreme coldness and ingratitude!

Were any of these persons afflicted with the least pain upon earth we would do all in our power to relieve them, but, as it is, we are devoid of all sympathy, and leave them in their terrible suffering and anguish.

 
The Special Duty of Children Towards Their Deceased Parents

“Honor thy father, and forget not the groanings of thy mother. Remember that hadst not been born but through them,and make a return to them; as they have done for thee.” – Eccl. vii. 29-30

Next to God, our parents are our greatest benefactors, entitled to our most tender love and gratitude, which is the sacred duty of every child. This duty does not end with this life; it is extended even to eternity. Should our departed parents find no relief in their pains? Must they cry out in bitter anguish: “I have reared sons and daughters, but they have forgotten me?”

If we compassionate the misery of strangers, if we do not heartlessly send a beggar from our doors, oh, let us remember how near and dear father and mother are to us, and how greatly we are indebted to them. After their death we owe them prayers, alms, good works, and especially Holy Masses.

They cry out to us for mercy. Would it not be the highest degree of ingratitude were we to forget those who bestowed their best love and care on us in life? God’s commandment: Honor thy father and thy mother is an obligation also towards our deceased parents.


Holy Mass & The Suffering Souls

 

The Sacrifice of the Mass is the great devotion of the Catholic Church, and, of all the means to assist the souls in Purgatory, none is more valuable or meritorious; for there, Jesus Christ offers Himself and His infinite merits to His Heavenly Father, by the hands of the priest, on behalf of the suffering souls.

The unbloody Sacrifice of the Mass does not essentially differ from the sacrifice of the cross, but only accidentally as to the mode of oblation, and no limit can be placed to the effect of this great sacrifice, which contains in itself all graces.

From this inestimable efficacy, however, we may not infer that the offering of one Mass is sufficient to release the souls we love; for, though the Sacrifice on Calvary was infinite, we cannot conclude that the application of it, through the Mass, must also be infinite.

Saint Thomas Aquinas tells us, it was not the intention of Jesus Christ to bestow the full efficacy of His suffering and death, which is celebrated in every Mass, upon us; His merits are applied according to His Adorable Will, for the ways of God are often inscrutable.

It is very salutary, therefore, to have the Holy Sacrifice offered frequently for the repose of a soul. Should the souls who are dear to us, for whom we intercede in this manner, be already in the enjoyment of eternal bliss, Divine Wisdom, in His goodness, will bestow the merit of the Masses offered on other suffering souls.

 

The Holy Rosary & The Suffering Souls

Saint Dominic declares that the redemption of the holy souls from Purgatory is one of the principal effects of the Rosary. The Venerable Alanus writes that many of the brethren had appeared to them whilst reciting the Rosary, and had declared that next to the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass there was no more powerful means than the Rosary to help the suffering souls. Also, the fact that numerous souls were daily released thereby, who would otherwise have been obliged to remain there for years. Saint Alphonsus Liguori teaches:

“If we wish to be of material assistance to the souls in Purgatory, we must always recommend them in our prayers to the Blessed Virgin Mary, and especially offer the Holy Rosary for them.”

Let us pray the daily Rosary; most especially recommended by Holy Mother Church and which is so pleasing to our Blessed Mother; a practice which she constantly asked of us at Fatima. Not only does it disclose to us a rich source of graces, but it’s also very efficacious in relieving the suffering souls and opening Heaven to them.

Should our labor prevent us from reciting the entire Rosary every day, let us, at least, say it in part. This simple homage to the Queen of Heaven will draw down great blessings both upon us and the holy souls, who will be wonderfully consoled and relieved if this devotion is offered on their behalf.

 

OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHAPEL
16 DOGWOOD ROAD SOUTH
HUBBARDSTON, MA 01452