Mass Schedule of Rev. Fr. David Hewko

January 2020

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
  • TIME CHANGE: Holy Mass 8:30pm in Canada
2
  • Holy Mass 9:00am in Canada
  • Holy Mass 6:30pm in Canada
3
  • (Location change)Holy Mass 8:00pm in Canada
  • Holy Mass 8:00am in Canada
4
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA
5
  • Holy Mass 10:00am in MA
6
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA
7
  • Holy Mass 7:30am in MA
8
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA
9
  • Holy Mass 7:30am in MA
10
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA
11
  • Holy Mass 8:00am in MA
  • Holy Mass 4:30pm in NJ
12
  • Holy Mass 8:00am in NY
  • Holy Mass 8:00pm in MI
  • Holy Mass 2:00pm in Canada
13
  • Holy mass 4:00pm in PA
  • Holy Mass 8:00am in MI
14
15
16
17
  • Cancelled / Mass in ND
18
  • Holy Mass 4:00pm in MN
  • Holy Mass 8:00am in MN
19
  • Holy Mass 7:00pm in IL
  • Holy Mass 11:00am in WI
20
  • Holy Mass 7:00am in IL
21
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA
22
  • Holy Mass 7:30am in MA
23
  • Holy Mass 7:30am in MA
24
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in MA
25
  • Holy Mass 9:00am in MA
26
  • Holy Mass 5:30pm in PA
  • Holy Mass 10:00am in NJ
27
28
29
30
31

+ SANCTUARY LAMP +

Announcing the availability of reserving the Sanctuary Lamp in Our Lady of Fatima Chapel (this is Fr Hewko’s personal chapel in Massachusetts). The red sanctuary lamp burns continually in honor of the Real & Divine Presence of Christ the King in our Chapel’s Tabernacle (or, as the little seer, Francisco Marto, so affectionately called it: the “Hidden Jesus”). Now, the faithful may reserve each new candle – burning in this honor – especially for their intentions. The votive lamp usually burns for 7 to 8 days… If you’d like to have the lamp burn for your intentions, simply send a note with your request, along with your name and the desired date if you have one. The suggested donation for each lamp lighting is $20.00

Send your request & offering, or any other donation to: paypal.me/ourladyofatimachapel
 

Our Lady of Fatima Chapel Sanctuary Lamp Honoring Our Lord’s Real Presence
 

 

OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHAPEL
16 DOGWOOD ROAD SOUTH
HUBBARDSTON, MA 01452

Contact:

ourladyofatimachapel@gmail.com

(Taken from Our Lady of Fatima Chapel’s August 2019 email)

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SCROLL DOWN TO VIEW THE MOST RECENT “OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHAPEL NEWSLETTER”. A SINCERE THANK YOU TO THE CHAPEL’S COORDINATOR FOR THIS COMPILATION.

 

 

   Our Lady of Fátima Chapel
     Massachusetts Mission of the SSPX-MC
 


Ecce Agnus Dei

This Week’s Holy Mass Schedule

(posted on above calendar )

The Second Sunday After the Epiphany
By Dom Prosper Guéranger, 1868 – The Liturgical Year 

The third Mystery of the Epiphany shows us the completion of the merciful designs of God upon the world, at the same time that it manifests to us, for the third time, the glory of our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ. The Star has led the soul to faith; the sanctified Waters of the Jordan have conferred purity upon her; the Marriage-Feast unites her to her God. We have been considering during this Octave, the Bridegroom revealing himself to the Spouse; we have heard him calling her to come to him from the heights of Libanus; and now, after having enlightened and purified her, he invites her to the heavenly feast, where she is to receive the Wine of his divine love.

A Feast is prepared; it is a Marriage-Feast; and the Mother of Jesus is present at it, for it is just, that, having co-operated in the mystery of the Incarnation of the Word, she should take part in all that her Son does, and in all the favours lie bestows on his elect. But, in the midst of the Feast, the Wine fails. Wine is the symbol of Charity or Love, and Charity had failed on the earth; for the Gentiles had never tasted its sweetness; and as to the Synagogue, what had it produced but wild grapes? [Is. v. 2]. The True Vine is our Jesus, and he calls himself by that name [St. John, xv. l]. He alone could give that Wine which gladdeneth the heart of man [Ps. ciii. 15]; He alone could give us that Chalice which inebriateth [Ibid. xxii. 5], and of which the Royal Psalmist prophesied.

Mary said to Jesus: They have no wine. It is the office of the Mother of God to tell him of the wants of men, for she is also their Mother. But Jesus answers her in words, which are apparently harsh: Woman! what is it to me and to thee? My hour is not yet come. The meaning of these words is, that, in this great Mystery, he was about to act, not as the Son of Mary, but as the Son of God. Later on, the hour will come when, dying upon the Cross, he will do a work, in the presence of his Mother, and he will do it as Man, that is, according to that human nature which he has received from her. Mary at once understands the words of her Son, and she says to the waiters of the Feast, what. she is now ever saying to her children: Do whatsoever he shall say to you.

Now, there were six large waterpots of stone there, and they were empty. The world was then in its Sixth Age, as St. Augustine and other Holy Doctors tell us. During these six ages, the earth had been awaiting its Saviour, who was to instruct and redeem it. Jesus commands these waterpots to be filled with water; and yet, water does not suit the Feast of the Spouse. The figures and the prophecies of the ancient world were this water, and until the opening of the Seventh Age, when Christ, who is the Vine, was to be given to the world, no man had contracted an alliance with the Divine Word.

But, when the Emmanuel came, he had but to say, Now draw out, and the waterpots were seen to be filled with the wine of the New Covenant, the Wine which had been kept to the end. When he assumed our human nature – a nature weak and unstable as Water – he effected a change in it; he raised it up even to himself, by making us partakers of the divine nature [II. St. Peter, i. 4]; he gave us the power to love him, to be united to him, to form that one Body, of which he is the Head, that Church of which he is the Spouse, and which he loved from all eternity, and with such tender love, that he came down from heaven to celebrate his nuptials with her.

O the wonderful dignity of man! God has vouchsafed, says the Apostle, to show the riches of his glory on the vessels of mercy, which had no claim to, nay, were unworthy of such an honour. Jesus bids the waiters fill them with water, and the water of Baptism purifies us; but, not satisfied with this, he fills these vessels, even to the brim, with that heavenly and new Wine, which was not to be drunk save in the kingdom of his Father [Rom. ix. 23]. Thus, divine Charity, which dwells in the Sacrament of Love, is communicated to us; and, that we might not be unworthy of the espousals with himself to which he called us, he raises us up even to himself. Let us, therefore, prepare our souls for this wonderful union, and, according to the advice of the Apostle, let us labour to present them to our Jesus with such purity as to resemble that chaste Virgin, who was presented to the spotless Lamb [II. Cor. xi. 2].

St. Matthew, the Evangelist of the Humanity of our Lord, has received from the Holy Ghost the commission to announce to us the Mystery of Faith by the Star; St. Luke, the Evangelist of Jesus’ Priesthood, has been selected, by the same Holy Spirit, to instruct us in the Mystery of the Baptism in the Jordan; but the Mystery of the Marriage-Feast was to be revealed to us by the Evangelist John, the Beloved Disciple. He suggests to the Church the object of this third Mystery, by this expression: This beginning of miracles did Jesus in Cana of Galilee, and he MANIFESTED his glory [St. John, ii. 11]. At Bethlehem, the Gold of the Magi expressed the Divinity of the Babe; at the Jordan, the descent of the Holy Ghost and the voice of the Eternal Father proclaimed Jesus, (known to the people as a carpenter of Nazareth) to be the Son of God; at Cana, it is Jesus himself that acts, and he acts as God, for, says St. Augustine, He who changed the water into wine in the waterpots could be no other than the same who, every year, works the same miracle in the vine. Hence it was, that, from that day, as St. John tells us, his disciples believed in him [Ibid.], and the Apostolic College began to be formed.

We cannot, therefore, be surprised that the Church – filled, as she is, with holy enthusiasm at the Feast of her Jesus’ glory, his Epiphany, and desirous to add fresh joy to the solemnity – should have chosen this Second Sunday after the Epiphany as the day on which to honour the Most Holy Name of JESUS. It is on the Wedding-Day that the Bride-groom gives his Name to his Bride, and it is the sign that, from that day forward, she belongs to him alone. The Church, therefore, would honour the Name of her Divine Spouse with an especial Feast, and no day could be more appropriate for it than this of the Marriage at Cana. [Ed: In 1913, Pope St. Pius X moved the feast to the Sunday between the 2nd and 5th of January inclusive; and in years when no such Sunday exists, the celebration is observed on January 2nd. Still, this entire month is consecrated to the Most Holy Name.]

In the Old Covenant, the Name of God inspired fear and awe: nor was the honour of pronouncing it granted to all the children of Israel. We can understand this. God had not yet come down from heaven to live on earth, and converse with men; he had not yet taken upon himself our poor nature, and become Man like ourselves; the sweet Name expressive of love and tenderness, could not be applied to him.

But, when the fullness of time had come – when the mystery of love was about to be revealed – then did heaven send down the Name of ‘Jesus’ to our earth, as a pledge of the speedy coming of him who was to bear it. The archangel Gabriel said to Mary: Thou shalt call his Name JESUS. ‘Jesus’ means Saviour. How sweet will this Name not be to poor lost man! It seems to link earth to heaven! No name is so amiable, none is so powerful. Every knee in heaven, on earth, and in hell, bows in adoration at hearing this Name! and yet, who can pronounce it, and not feel love spring up within his heart? But we need such a saint as Bernard, to tell us of the power and sweetness of this blessed Name. He thus speaks of it in one of his Sermons.

‘The Name of Jesus is Light, and Food, and Medicine. It is Light, when it is preached to us; it is Food, when we think upon it; it is the Medicine that soothes our pains when we invoke it. Let us say a word on each of these. Tell me, whence came there, into the whole world, so bright and sudden a light, if not from the preaching of the Name of Jesus? Was it not by the light of this Name that God called us unto his admirable Light? Wherewith being enlightened, and in this light, seeing the Light, we take these words of Paul as truly addressed to ourselves: Heretofore, you were darkness; but now, light in the Lord [Eph. v. 8].

‘Nor is the Name of Jesus Light only; it is also Food. Art thou not strengthened, as often as thou thinkest of this Name? What is there that so feeds the mind of him that meditates upon this Name? What is there that so restores the wearied faculties, strengthens virtue, gives vigour to good and holy habits, and fosters chastity? Every food of the soul is dry, that is not steeped in this unction; it is insipid, if it be not seasoned with this salt. If thou write, I relish not thy writing, unless I read there the Name of Jesus. If thou teach me, or converse with me, I relish not thy words, unless I hear thee say the Name of Jesus. JESUS is honey to the mouth, and music to the ear, and gladness to the heart.

‘It is also Medicine. Is any one among you sad? Let but Jesus come into his heart, and the mouth echo him, saying Jesus! and lo! the light of that Name disperses every cloud, and brings sunshine back again. Have any of you committed sin? and is despair driving you into the snare of death? Invoke the Name of life, and life will come back to the soul. Was there ever a man, that, hearing this saving Name, could keep up that common fault of hardness of heart, or drowsiness of sluggishness, or rancour of soul, or languor of sloth? If any one, perchance, felt that the fountain of his tears was dry, did it not gush forth more plentifully than ever, and flow more sweetly than ever, as soon as he invoked the Name of Jesus? If any of us were ever in danger, and our heart beat with fear, did not this Name of power bring us confidence and courage the moment we pronounced it? When we were tossed to and fro by perplexing doubts, did not the evidence of what was right burst on us as we called upon the Name of light? When we were discouraged, and well nigh crushed, by adversity, did not our heart take courage, when our tongue uttered the Name of help? All this is most true; for all these miseries are the sicknesses and faintings of our soul, and the Name of Jesus is our Medicine.

‘But, let us see how all this comes to pass. Call upon me in the day of trouble, says the Lord; I will deliver thee, and thou shall glorify me [Ps. xlix 15]. There is nothing which so restrains the impulse of anger, calms the swelling of pride, heals the wound of envy, represses the insatiability of luxury, smothers the flame of lust, quenches the thirst of avarice, and dispels the fever of uncleanliness – as the Name of Jesus. For when I pronounce this Name, I bring before my mind the Man, who, by excellence, is meek and humble of heart, benign, sober, chaste, merciful, and filled with everything that is good and holy, nay, who is the very God Almighty – whose example heals me, and whose assistance strengthens me. I say all this, when I say Jesus. Here have I my model, for he is Man; and my help, for he is God; the one provides me with precious drugs, the other gives them efficacy; and from the two I make a potion such as no physician knows how to make.

‘Here is the electuary, my soul, hid in the casket of this Name Jesus; believe me, it is wholesome, and good for every ailment thou canst possibly have. Ever have it with thee, in thy bosom and in thy hand; so that all thy affections and actions may be directed to JESUS.’ [Fifteenth Sermon on the canticle of Canticles.]

This is the sweet and powerful Name, which was given to our Emmanuel, on the day of his Circumcision. But, as that day was the Octave of Christmas, and was already sacred to the Maternity of Mary, the present Sunday, the Second after the Epiphany, was chosen for celebrating the mystery of the Name of the Lamb. The first promoter of the Feast was St Bernardine of Siena, who lived in the fifteenth century. This holy man established the practice of representing the Holy Name of Jesus surrounded with rays, and formed into a monogram of its three first letters, IHS [The Name was, anciently, often written Ihesus; hence, in its contracted form alluded to, the letter H would be given: the E  following was virtually included in the aspirate. Translator.] The custom spread rapidly through Italy, and was zealously propagated by the great St John of Capestrano, who, like St Bernardine of Siena, was of the Order of Friars Minor. The Holy See gave its formal approbation to this manner of honouring the Name of our Saviour, and, in the early part of the sixteenth century, Pope Clement VI, after long entreaties, granted to the whole Franciscan Order the privilege of keeping a special Feast in honour of the Most Holy Name of Jesus.

Rome extended the same favour to various Churches; and, at length, the Feast was inserted in the universal Calendar. It was in the year 1721, at the request of Charles VI, Emperor of Germany, that Pope Innocent XII decreed that the Feast of the Most Holy Name of Jesus should be kept throughout the whole Church; he also chose the Second Sunday after the Epiphany as the day. We have already explained how appropriately their respective mysteries have been thus blended into the one solemnity.

 
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